Church bells ring anew in freed Mosul district

An Iraqi woman and child stand just outside a shelter built for refugees driven from their homes by Islamic extremists. (Photo, caption courtesy of Voice of the Martyrs)

 

Iraq (MNN) — Iraqi forces continued a slow-but-steady advance in more of Mosul’s eastern districts last week, according to The Washington Post. Several eastern areas of Mosul have already been liberated from ISIS’ grip. But the whole city’s freedom could still take months to secure.

Emily Fuentes with Open Doors USA says some displaced families from Mosul are trying to decide if and when they should return to the secured districts. Continue reading

Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates send their troops to Yemen

The head of the Foreign Ministry of the Republic, Riyad Yassin, confirmed this information.

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Liberation without the Liberators

BERLIN/WARSAW (Own report) – Through their virtual disinvitation, EU countries are preventing the Russian president from participating at the commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. The highest representative of the country, whose army had halted the mass murder in the German extermination camp January 27, 1945, is thereby excluded from the commemoration ceremonies. However, Germany’s president, will participate. Joachim Gauck had already used his speech on the 75th anniversary of Germany’s invasion of Poland, to massively stir up sentiments against Moscow and to transform the commemoration of Nazi crimes into an appeal for closing ranks against Russia. In his memoirs, Gauck described Red Army soldiers, who had liberated Germany, as beings “with Asian facial features,” “reeking of Vodka,” who “requisitioned and stole.” A few years ago, he complained, “the occurrence of the German Judeocide has been inflated to a uniqueness,” because “certain milieus of post religious societies” were seeking “a certain shudder in face of the unspeakable.” In 2010, he was quoted saying, he “wonders how much longer we Germans want to nurture our culture of chagrin.”

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Alsace at the Forefront

The “Conseil d’Alsace”

In late November, parliamentarians of the two Rhine-region French departments (67, Bas-Rhin, and 68, Haut-Rhin) passed a resolution establishing a new “Conseil d’Alsace” (Alsace Council). The gist of this complicated administrative procedure consists of combining the two departments’ respective “Conseils Generaux” (General Councils) with the “Conseil Regional d’Alsace” (the Regional Council of Alsace),[1] to create a supervisory administrative body, to consolidate the previously scattered responsibilities, thereby, closer conflating the two departments. The new administrative unit is officially known as the “Collectivité territoriale d’Alsace,” but it is often simply referred to as the “Conseil d’Alsace” (Alsace Council). Its parliamentary assembly will be situated in Strasbourg, while the related “Executive Council” (similar to a regional government) is to be seated in Colmar. According to plans, individual “specialized administrations” will be headquartered in Mulhouse. This project, scheduled to be implemented by 2015, must now be adopted by the region’s inhabitants in a referendum, planned for April 7, 2013.[2] It is expected to pass with a large majority. In parliament, the vote on the project had resulted in a majority of 108 in favor, to five against and nine abstentions. Continue reading