Plan B For Iran

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If the nuclear negotiations go bad, the U.S. has a backup: Obama can drop the MOP, the world’s largest non-nuclear bomb.

President Barack Obama’s nuclear diplomacy with Iran may yet fail. On Tuesday, exactly one week before a June 30 deadline for an agreement, Iran’s Supreme Leader delivered his latest in a series of defiant statements, setting conditions for a deal—including immediate relief from sanctions, before Iran has taken steps to limit its nuclear program—that Obama will never accept. Secretary of State John Kerry warned last week that the U.S. is prepared to walk away from the talks. And even if a deal is reached, the story is not over. The Iranians may break or cheat on an agreement, and try build a nuclear weapon anyway.

That’s why, at least three times in the past year, a B-2 stealth bomber has taken off from an Air Force base in Missouri and headed west to the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. For these missions, the $2 billion plane was outfitted with one of the world’s largest bombs. It is a cylinder of special high-performance steel, 20 feet long and weighing 15 tons. When dropped from an altitude likely above 20,000 feet, the bomb would have approached supersonic speed before striking a mock target in the desert, smashing through rock and burrowing deep into the ground before its 6,000 pounds of high explosives detonated with devastating force. Continue reading

Missile attacks new ‘norm’: U.S. told it now needs Israel’s Iron Dome system

An Israeli missile is launched from the Iron Dome defense missile system in Ashdod, November 18, 2012. /AFP

A leading U.S. institute asserted that Washington must procure Iron Dome
in wake of its interception of hundreds of Palestinian missiles and rockets
fired from the Gaza Strip.

The Lexington Institute said the United States and other Western countries could come under the same missile threat as Israel. Continue reading

Report: China, Russia missile tech threatens U.S. interests in Mideast

This is a prime example of what makes regional war so dangerous this time around. You may sink their ships. You might bomb their tanks. You might even take out quite a number of their military installations and facilities… But what about those that are buried deep in the ground and unreachable to the current weapons the US and Israel may have and use? Or better yet, what about the sites we don’t know about? Both Syria and Iran have tens of thousands of missiles, and they’re advanced. We could lose quite a few bases and ships, resulting in tens of thousands of lives lost on the Allied side.

WASHINGTON — Middle East adversaries could threaten U.S. military bases with advanced ballistic missiles, a think tank said.

The Lexington Institute asserted that Middle East allies of China and Russia were receiving missile technology that threaten U.S. bases in the
region.

The institute, regarded as being close to the Defense Department, said Iran and Syria were developing ballistic missiles that could target U.S. and Western facilities. Continue reading

Past inattention, present budget woes mean US Air Force must keep its aging warhorses flying

As the US Air Force technology becomes outdated, it becomes more expensive to maintain. Ironically and unfortunately, cuts have been made mostly in newer tech which only further compounds the problem of an aging military power.

For decades, the U.S. Air Force has grown accustomed to such superlatives as unrivaled and unbeatable. These days, some of its key combat aircraft are being described with terms like geriatric, or decrepit.

The aging of the U.S. Air Force, a long-simmering topic in defense circles, made a brief appearance in the presidential debates when Republican nominee Mitt Romney cited it as evidence of the decline of U.S. military readiness. His contention that the Navy is the smallest it’s been since 1917 got more attention, thanks to President Barack Obama’s quip that the Navy also has fewer “horses and bayonets.” Continue reading