While the world watches Syria, Russia is creeping closer to Georgia

Concrete bollards mark the "border" between Georgia and the breakaway region of South Ossetia outside Gori, Georgia. The ...

Concrete bollards mark the “border” between Georgia and the breakaway region of South Ossetia outside Gori, Georgia. The Russian and Ossetian flags can be seen in the distance. Photo: New York Times

 

Jariasheni, Georgia: Marked in places with barbed wire laid at night, in others by the sudden appearance of green signs declaring the start of a “state border” and elsewhere by the arrival of bulldozers, the reach of Russia keeps inching forward into Georgia – with ever more ingenious markings of a frontier that only Russia and three other states recognise as real.

But while dismissed by most of the world as a make-believe border, the dirt track now running through this tiny Georgian village nonetheless means that Vephivia Tatiashvili can no longer go to his three-storey house because it sits on land now patrolled by Russian border guards.

That track marks the world’s newest and perhaps oddest international frontier; the elastic boundary between Georgian-controlled land and the Republic of South Ossetia, a self-proclaimed breakaway state financed, defended and controlled by Moscow. Continue reading

Concerns Russia moving to annex South Ossetia as treaty signed with Georgia breakaway region

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a wide-ranging treaty with the Georgian breakaway region of South Ossetia, which critics say paves the way for Moscow to annex the territory.

The “Treaty on Alliance and Integration” determines the long-term relations between Russia and South Ossetia, Putin said after signing the document in the Kremlin with Leonid Tibilov, the region’s president. Continue reading

Ex-KGB Boss Is South Ossetia’s New President

In actuality, this has less to do with bringing back an “old dream” to a small ‘breakaway region’ and more to do with the USSR reasserting itself.

A former KGB chief has won the presidency in Georgia’s breakaway region of South Ossetia, where Moscow is trying to re-assert control.

Leonid Tibilov, 60, won with 54.1% of the vote in a run-off against presidential human rights commissioner David Sanakoyev, election commission chief Bella Pliyeva said.

“We will develop the relationship with Russia in all areas. We are aiming to make an old dream about the reunification of South and North Ossetia a reality,” he told reporters at a polling station in the region’s capital, Tskhinvali.

Full article: Ex-KGB Boss Is South Ossetia’s New President (Sky News)