Pentagon: ‘Rising Chinese Military Has Taiwan in Its Crosshairs’

Always remember a Chinese war with Taiwan goes beyond the scope of simple reunification via force. As per the quotes page:

“The central committee believes, as long as we resolve the United States problem at one blow, our domestic problems will all be readily solved. Therefore, our military battle preparation appears to aim at Taiwan, but in fact is aimed at the United States, and the preparation is far beyond the scope of attacking aircraft carriers or satellites.

– Chi Haotian, Minster of Defense and vice-chairman of China’s Central Military Commission

 

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Soldiers attend the state memorial ceremony for China’s National Memorial Day for Nanjing Massacre Victims at the Nanjing massacre memorial hall on December 13, 2018 in Nanjing, Jiangsu Province of China. (Getty Images)

 

China is ‘on the verge of fielding some of the most modern weapon systems in the world. In some areas, it already leads the world.’

China has made major military advancements and developed new weapons technologies as it works to boost its ability to wage war over places such as Taiwan, according to a January 15 report from the United States Defense Intelligence Agency.

“Beijing’s long-standing interest to eventually compel Taiwan’s reunification with the mainland and deter any attempt by Taiwan to declare independence has served as the primary driver for China’s military modernization,” the report said. Continue reading

Xi meets Taiwan opposition leader, stresses ‘One China’

Chinese president Xi Jinping met the leader of Taiwan’s opposition party Tuesday as Beijing’s relations with the island’s new president worsen.

Xi met Kuomintang (KMT) leader Hung Hsiu-chu at the Great Hall of the People, the official Xinhua news agency said. Continue reading

PLA aiming 1,500 missiles at Taiwan: defense ministry

Lin Yu-fang, a legislator for Taiwan’s ruling Kuomintang, said Monday that China poses an ever-growing threat to Taiwan and the Asia-Pacific region as a whole, as its Second Artillery Corps has been renovating weaponry and upgrading missile deployments. Continue reading

‘Taiwan issue’ will not go unresolved indefinitely, PLA general warns

A PLA general has warned that “the Taiwan issue will not remain unresolved in the long term” and that China is not ruling out the use of force to achieving unification after Taiwan’s ruling Kuomintang suffered a drubbing in last month’s local government elections. The major winner at the polls was the opposition Democratic Progressive Party, which has traditionally advocated Taiwan independence.

“We will not abandon the possibility of using force. According to the law, it is also an option to resolve the issue by military means if necessary,” Liu Jingsong, a former president of the Chinese Academy of Military Sciences, said in a keynote speech on Nov. 6 at a conference organized by China’s nationalistic tabloid Global Times. Continue reading

Special Report: How China’s shadowy agency is working to absorb Taiwan

This is a Chinese ‘charm offensive’ in full motion. It’s of course more wise than gunboat diplomacy, for which they already have thousands of missiles ready at a moment’s notice to rain down on Taiwan, but equally as dangerous in the long-term for the United States. The end-game aim for China is to push America completely out of Asia, for a regional Asian bloc and have nations (for example) such as Japan, both Koreas and Vietnam under its protectorate umbrella.

 

(Reuters) – Ever since a civil war split the two sides more than 60 years ago, China has viewed Taiwan as a renegade province that needs to be absorbed into the mainland. To that end, the legion of Taiwanese businessmen working in China is a beachhead.

In June, hundreds of those businessmen gathered in a hotel ballroom in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen. They were there to toast the new head of a local Taiwan merchants’ association. They sipped baijiu liquor and ate seafood as a troupe performed a traditional lion dance for good luck. An honored guest, senior Communist Party official Li Jiafan, stood to deliver congratulations and a message.

“I urge our Taiwanese friends to continue to work hard in your fields to contribute to the realization of the Chinese dream as soon as possible,” said Li, using a nationalist slogan President Xi Jinping has popularized. “The Chinese dream is also the dream of the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait – our dream of reunification.”

Li, who ended his speech to beating drums and loud applause, is a department chief in the Shenzhen arm of the United Front Work Department, an organ of the Communist Party’s Central Committee. Its mission: to spread China’s influence by ultimately gaining control over a range of groups not affiliated with the party and that are often outside the mainland.

United Front documents reviewed by Reuters, including annual reports, instructional handbooks and internal newsletters, as well as interviews with Chinese and Taiwanese officials reveal the extent to which the agency is engaged in a concerted campaign to thwart any move toward greater independence by Taiwan and ultimately swallow up the self-ruled island of 23 million. Continue reading

Xi Jinping pushes his Taiwan policy

With the US in suicidal free-fall, China knows now is the time for charm diplomacy. All it has to do is point the finger in America’s direction to show that it’s not a reliable partner, that China is able to push American military out of the Asia Pacific with its missile technology. Taiwan, as well as the Koreas and Japan will shift towards an Asian bloc/union with China being the umbrella protectorate. It’s better to join the team if, without US backing, you can’t beat them.

 

Chinese president Xi Jinping, who is also the general secretary of the Communist Party of China’s Central Committee, said during his speech on Sept. 26 that “one country, two systems” is his country’s formula for Taiwan’s future, triggering heated debates in Taiwan.

In a speech delivered during a meeting with a Taiwanese delegation composed of the island’s pro-reunification groups, Xi spelled out China’s bottom line on the Taiwan issue before the fourth plenary session of the 18th Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee, slated to be held from Oct. 20 to 23.

Xi espoused the “one country, two systems” proposal for unification, mainly based on his judgments of CPC power, China’s role in foreign relations, and the situation in Taiwan. Continue reading

Taiwan jumps into South China Sea fray

China is on the ‘charm’ offensive to rein in Taiwan.

Last week, James Chou, deputy director general of the Taiwanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, stressed that the disputed islands of the South China Sea were the “undisputed territory” of the ROC. Additionally, Chou expressed a strong desire for the ROC to take part in any multilateral mechanism in resolving the long-standing territorial impasse. He said any resolution of the conflict that did not involve the ROC would be “regrettable”.

Chou’s assertion of the “undisputed” nature of Chinese sovereignty in the area echoed the recurring message of the Foreign Ministry of the People’s Republic of China. Both the mainland-based PRC and the ROC maintain the same “nine-dotted line” claim to the vast majority of the South China Sea. It is important to note that the current official policy of both Taipei and Beijing is that there is “one China”, and both governments strongly agree on Chinese sovereignty in the South China Sea. The pivotal disagreement of cross-strait relations hinges on which of the two governments is the legitimate ruler of China itself.

Even more interesting, a high-ranking government official in Taipei has recently called for a ROC-PRC economic alliance in the South China Sea. Chiu Yi, an important member of Taiwan’s ruling Kuomintang (KMT) party and an executive in the state-owned energy company CPC, has called for open cooperation between the PRC and the ROC in extracting resources from the disputed waters: “The seabed around Taiping Island has abundant reserves of oil and natural gas … The merit would be great if a cross-strait joint development project is done.” [3]

The ROC Foreign Ministry’s recently stated desire to participate in any multilateral mechanisms for resolving the maritime dispute is particularly telling. Beijing’s insistence on a strict “one China” policy has excluded Taipei from most international organizations. However, Taipei’s participation in a multilateral, negotiated settlement to the South China Sea impasse would likely strengthen the joint Chinese claims of sovereignty over key islands.

Rumors are now circulating of a grand bargain being negotiated between Taipei and Beijing. Joint PRC-ROC cooperation in the South China Sea may be exchanged for Beijing’s approval of Taipei’s participation in some international organizations. Issues of sovereignty would need to be carefully addressed in any deal, but the potential for mutual benefit is significant.

Joint PRC-ROC cooperation in the South China Sea would also pose a significant challenge for US policy. The US government has been strengthening military ties with the Philippines and Vietnam with the unstated aim of containing Chinese ambitions in the area. Meanwhile, Taiwan has long been a US ally. If Chinese nationalism remains politically ascendant in Taiwan, and a joint PRC-ROC alliance is formed in the South China Sea, the US will find itself in a very awkward position.

Full article: Taiwan jumps into South China Sea fray (Asia Times Online)