The China Problem

Un Xi Trump

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Column: North Korea is just a part of the challenge confronting Trump and the United States

“I think I understand why that happened,” President Trump said Thursday, reflecting on a change in North Korean behavior that prompted him to cancel a planned summit with Kim Jong Un in Singapore on June 12. When a reporter asked him to elaborate, the president declined.

Allow me to speculate.

Until recently, the prospects of a summit were high. Experiencing the consequences of debilitating sanctions under President Trump’s “maximum pressure” campaign, Kim Jong Un signaled a new openness. North and South Koreans marched together in the opening ceremonies of the Winter Olympics. Kim pledged to suspend missile testing and destroy an already-disabled nuclear facility in advance of talks. And most important, at the beginning of May, Kim freed three American hostages in what Trump would describe as a “beautiful gesture” that “was very much appreciated.”

Then the turn came. Continue reading

Pax China: Manila’s capitulation sets ominous precedent for U.S. allies in Far East

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, left, with Chinese President Xi Jinping after a signing ceremony in Beijing on Oct. 20. / Ng Han Guan / AP

 

Rodrigo Duterte was reputed as a killer long before his election as president of the Philippines five months ago. He countenanced the slaughter of hundreds of drug addicts and dealers while mayor of Davao, the major port city on the rebel-infested southern island of Mindanao, and has applauded the arbitrary killing of upwards of 2,000 more druggies as president.

Duterte’s brutality, though, doesn’t mean he’s interested in battling China on behalf of his country in the South China Sea. In fact, he’s confounded strategists in Washington by appearing to disavow the historic Philippine-American alliance, aligning with the Chinese while tossing out agreements with the U.S. He’s saying, in effect, “Yankee Go Home.” Continue reading

China says it’s ready if US ‘stirs up any conflict’ in South China Sea

Make no mistake about it, regardless of how communist Chinese officials downplay or whitewash it, they want war. Internal problems (social and economic) are forcing the CCP to make a choice: Distract the nation by placing the blame outward, or own up to the failures of Communism and lose your grip on power in a violent overthrow of government.

Ask Chi Haotian, once Vice-Chairman of China’s military commision who said in his 2005 speech that conquering America is a must for China’s survival and that America must be exterminated (click HERE for a Biblical perspective).

This article should come as no surprise as it wouldn’t be the first time China has threatened war with the United States. Some years ago, Colonel Meng Xianging said there would be hand-to-hand combat with America within the next ten years.

In 2007, China also threatened to nuke the U.S. Dollar — a claim it can still make good on.

As an indicator, and as geopolitical expert JR Nyquist has warned about, When the China Bubble Bursts, war is around the corner.

 

BEIJING — China’s attempts to claim a nearly 1.4-million-square-mile swathe of open ocean are without precedent and probably without legal merit, but Beijing continues to assert its right to the economically critical zone — and increasingly puts its claims in military terms.

Speaking to a small group of reporters in Beijing on Thursday, a high-ranking Chinese official made his warning clear: The United States should not provoke China in the South China Sea without expecting retaliation.

“The Chinese people do not want to have war, so we will be opposed to [the] U.S. if it stirs up any conflict,” said Liu Zhenmin, vice minister of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. “Of course, if the Korean War or Vietnam War are replayed, then we will have to defend ourselves.”

Continue reading

The Army Is the Smallest It Has Been Since Before World War II, And Other Signs of the Military’s Decline

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While threats against the U.S. are increasing, our military strength is not. (Photo: Department of Defense/Sipa USA/Newscom)

 

The Heritage Foundation released its 2016 Index of U.S. Military Strength today, and its findings are cause for concern. While potential adversaries have either grown more threatening or maintained their levels of aggressiveness, U.S. military strength continues to atrophy due to budget cuts and lack of prioritization from the Obama administration.

To give a couple of key examples: the current size of the Marine Corps is 184,100, which is smaller than the Corps was during the Korean War, and the Navy’s battle force ships is the smallest since before World War I.

But the world needs the U.S. to maintain a strong military. Though some of America’s allies have begun to take their own security more seriously, the U.S. remains the primary underwriter of maintaining global stability. Continue reading

North Korea threatens to ‘leave no Americans alive’ as Kim Jong-un boasts of nuclear arsenal, on Korean War armistice anniversary

North Korean citizens flocked to mass patriotic gatherings and dances in honour of the armistice day, in honour of the agreement, which was signed on 27 July 1953.

The armistice is hailed every year as a North Korean victory over America, which fought alongside South Korea and UN forces against North Korean forces, which were backed by China and the USSR.

Continue reading

Is an Asian NATO Possible?

In the new concluding chapter to his classic The Tragedy of Great Power Politics, John Mearsheimer argues: “There is already substantial evidence that countries like India, Japan, and Russia, as well as smaller powers like Singapore, South Korea, and Vietnam, are worried about China’s ascendancy and are looking for ways to contain it. In the end, they will join an American-led balancing coalition to check China’s rise, much the way Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and eventually China, joined forces with the United States during the Cold War to contain the Soviet Union.”

This is at odds with most analyses which postulate that Asia is not ripe for a NATO style containment block against China. For instance, in summing up the conventional wisdom on the subject, the Council on Foreign Relations’ Stewart Patrick opined last summer that: “Despite its strategic ‘rebalancing’ toward Asia, the United States is unlikely to sponsor a collective defense organization for the Asia-Pacific, for at least three reasons: insufficient solidarity among diverse regional partners, fear of alienating China, and the perceived advantages of bilateral and ad-hoc security arrangements.”

Continue reading

Inside the Ring: Russia boosts Cuba ties

The Russian military recently dispatched a guided-missile warship to Cuba as part of what U.S. officials say are growing military, intelligence and economic ties between Moscow and Havana.

The missile cruiser is the Moskva, the flagship of the Russian Black Sea fleet, according to state-run Russian news reports. Continue reading

India and South Korea :Strategic ‘Partners’ With Long term Goals

India and South Korea share remarkable common interests – all the more remarkable considering how far apart they are geographically, in area, popula­tion, average income, living conditions and climate. And then consider how different are Indians and Koreans in ethnic and linguistic backgrounds, religious beliefs and influences. It’s hard to imagine two such important na­tions and societies with so little in common, yet so close­ly bound by security and economic considerations.

Yes, appearances can be extremely de­ceiving in a fast-moving high-tech world in which potentially cataclysmic military pressures, on top of domestic political power struggles and the need for trade and commerce, outweigh so much else. After considering all the differences, just look at all India and South Korea have in common. Continue reading

North Korea: Kim Jong-Un’s 30,000 elite troops could pour through secret underground tunnels into South Korea

Through a cold mist, South Korean troops scan their frontier for signs of an attack by warmongering North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un.

Behind razor wire and machine gun nests, nervous soldiers man artillery positions ready to blitz the dictator’s forces dug in less than a mile away.

But while their eyes peer into the mist, the onslaught may yet begin where they cannot see… 100 feet below their boots. Continue reading

Mao’s ‘Nuclear Mass Extinction Speech’ Aired on Chinese TV

To understand today’s CCP, one must look back on the history. Chinese military doctrine has not changed since the Mao era. Instead, it has become more hostile and is evident through what their high ranking military officers say.

During the Chinese New Year, the Chinese regime’s documentary channel, CCTV-9, ran a series on declassified China-Russia foreign affair files dating back to the Mao Zedong era. One episode showed Mao’s never-before-aired famous 1957 speech in which he boasted that he had no fear of nuclear war nor how many of the world’s people would be killed, including in China.

With two episodes broadcast nightly for a week, the 18-episode documentary presented historical events previously unknown to the public, including the relationship between China and the former Soviet Union after 1949, and details of the Korean War, and the Taiwan Strait wars.

It also revealed Mao’s relationship with Joseph Stalin and Nikita Khrushchev, his successor, exposing many instances of mutual scheming, betrayal, political blackmailing and extortion through witness testimonies from Rong Zhi, who worked at the Soviet embassy to China, and Shi Zhe, the daughter of Mao’s early Russian interpreter. Continue reading

NKorea vows to cancel Korean War cease-fire

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) – North Korea vowed Tuesday to cancel the 1953 cease-fire that ended the Korean War, citing a U.S.-led push for punishing U.N. sanctions over its recent nuclear test and ongoing U.S.-South Korean joint military drills. Continue reading

S. Korea to deploy guided missiles at sea border: report

South Korea plans to deploy Israeli-made precision guided missiles near its tense sea border with North Korea next month, including an island shelled by the North in 2010, a report said Friday.

The South will deploy 50 to 60 Spike anti-tank missiles to two border islands on the Yellow Sea to guard against potential attacks from the North, the Chosun Ilbo daily cited a Seoul military official as saying.

The two islands are Baengnyeong, the closest island to the disputed maritime border, and Yeonpyeong, which was shelled by the North in November 2010 in an attack that left four South Koreans including two civilians dead. Continue reading

US special forces ‘parachuted into North Korea’

US and South Korean special forces have been parachuting into North Korea to gather intelligence about underground military installations, according to a senior US officer.

Army Brigadier General Neil Tolley, commander of US special forces in South Korea, told a conference held in Florida last week that Pyongyang had built thousands of tunnels since the Korean war, The Diplomat reported.

Gen Tolley said the commandos were sent in with minimal equipment to facilitate their movements and minimize the risk of detection by North Korean forces.

At least four of the tunnels built by Pyongyang go under the Demilitarized Zone separating North and South Korea, Tolley said.

Full article: US special forces ‘parachuted into North Korea’ (The Telegraph)