Saudi Arabia Scooping Up Land in Northern Virginia

Saudi national flag

Saudi national flag / Getty Images

 

Saudi Arabia is scooping up large swaths of land in Northern Virginia, just a stone’s throw away from the nation’s capital, according to local reports.

“The Saudi government now owns five adjacent properties on the grandiose corridor in McLean that is home to high-profile, pricey estates and bucolic views of the Potomac River, according to government assessment records,” Washington Business Journal reported. Continue reading

The First Exit

Will this “core group” consist of ten nations in a new kingdom with ten kings, as Bibically prophesied in Revelation 13: 1,2 and Daniel 7? Only time will tell.

LONDON/BERLIN (Own report) – The British people’s vote yesterday to take their country out of the EU is shaking up the EU, and Berlin’s plans to use the EU for its own hegemonic policies. With a 72 percent turnout, 52 percent of the British voters opted to wave good-bye to the EU. This vote has a major impact on Berlin, not only because Europe’s second largest economy – after Germany’s – and a prominent military power will be leaving the EU and therefore no longer be available for German hegemonic policies imposed via the EU. It also can lead to a domino effect. Calls for referendums are being raised in other EU member countries. In several member countries, the EU’s growing unpopularity is reinforcing centrifugal forces. The Swedish foreign minister has explicitly warned of a “spill-over effect” that could lead to a Swedish EU exit. In the German media, demands are being raised to simply ignore the referendum and let the British parliament vote in favor of remaining in the EU. Berlin has already begun reinforcing its national positions – independent of the EU.

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Saudi Arabia risks destroying Opec and feeding the Isil monster

‘Saudi Arabia is acting directly against the interests of half the cartel and is running Opec over a cliff,’ says RBC

The rumblings of revolt against Saudi Arabia and the Opec Gulf states are growing louder as half a trillion dollars goes up in smoke, and each month that goes by fails to bring about the long-awaited killer blow against the US shale industry.

Algeria’s former energy minister, Nordine Aït-Laoussine, says the time has come to consider suspending his country’s Opec membership if the cartel is unwilling to defend oil prices and merely serves as the tool of a Saudi regime pursuing its own self-interest. “Why remain in an organisation that no longer serves any purpose?” he asked.

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Saudi princes said to call for regime change

Apparently Iran was on to something when it said the Saudi leadership wouldn’t be around in another 20 years from now. Maybe Iran knew beforehand something was going on behind the scenes. Maybe Iran penetrated the Saudi leadership circles and now have influence.

We’ll know more in the future about any possible influence as events unfold, especially if they become pro-Iran.

If Iran ever somehow took control of Saudi Arabia through influential channels, or united with them, they will have succeeded in their long-term ambitions of becoming the Middle East hegemon and new superpower on the world stage. How events have already been unfolding throughout the last decades, it seems already likely, but this would erase all doubt that Iran is the Biblically prophesied King of the South.

 

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Genealogical table of the leaders of the Āl Saud. (Image by Slackerlawstudent)

 

Senior member of Saudi royal family calls for coup to replace King Salman as the country’s leader

A Saudi prince has reportedly launched an unprecedented campaign against Saudi King Salman, calling for a coup to replace the monarch, claiming he “led the country to disaster.”

Speaking to the British daily The Guardian, the unnamed prince — one of the hundreds of grandsons of the nation’s founder, Abdulaziz Ibn Saud — said plans were being put into place to replace Salman, who succeeded King Abdullah in January. Continue reading

Saudi Press: We Must Have A Military Nuclear Program Within A Decade

Following the July 14, 2015 announcement in Vienna of the Iran-P5+1 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, the Saudi press featured numerous articles openly calling for Saudi Arabia and the Gulf states to use the coming decade – the time frame of the JCPOA – to develop their own military nuclear program, against the nuclear threat that they say Iran will constitute after the agreement expires.

There have already been calls for a clandestine Saudi nuclear program to parallel Iran’s, which were backed up by official Saudi sources. For example, the month before the announcement of the JCPOA, Saudi Ambassador to the U.K. Emir Muhammad bin Nawwaf bin ‘Abd Al-‘Aziz Al-Saud told the Daily Telegraph that if the upcoming nuclear agreement with Iran did not include a serious Iranian commitment to refrain from developing nuclear weapons, then as far as Saudi Arabia is concerned, “all options are on the table.” He emphasized that over the years, his country had opposed the development of nuclear weapons, but that Iran’s policy on the issue “has changed the whole outlook in the region.”[1] Continue reading

Saudi Arabia’s proxy wars

Saudi Arabia appears resolute: It wants Bashar Al-Assad out of Damascus. The Saudis view the fighting in Syria with the same intensity that they did the civil war in Yemen that raged in the 1960s—as a conflict with wide and serious repercussions that will shape the political trajectory of the Middle East for years to come.

The Syrian war presents the Saudis with a chance to hit three birds with one stone: Iran, its rival for regional dominance, Tehran’s ally Assad and his Hezbollah supporters. But Riyadh’s policy makers are wary. They know that once fully committed, it will be difficult to disengage. And so they are taking to heart the lessons of another regional war that flared on their border 50 years ago. Continue reading

Report: Saudi Arabia ‘could be a net oil importer by 2030′

WASHINGTON — Saudi Arabia could end up becoming an importer of crude
oil, a report said.

Bright lights of Riyadh: Power demands in the kingdom
are rising by eight percent per year. /Reuters

 

Citigroup said Saudi Arabia was rapidly depleting its oil reserves,
particularly through electricity generation. Continue reading