Fukushima Radiation Increasing In North American Waters … Detected Along a Stretch of More Than 1,000 Miles

Ken Buesseler – head scientist at Woods Hole in Massachusetts,  one of the world’s top ocean science institutions – has been measuring Fukushima radiation off of the coasts of Japan and North America.

Because governments ditched their radiation testing programs after the Fukushima nuclear accident, Buesseler has to crowdfund his monitoring efforts. Continue reading

Fukushima’s radioactive waste reaches North America

(NaturalNews) Radiation from the Fukushima explosion has reached North America. On April 12, 2015, scientists collected seawater with radioactive isotopes from the Fukushima meltdown. The samples were collected at Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, just north of the United States border, at the Ucluelet Aquarium. The report of the findings were made by Ken Buesseler, senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), located in Cape Cod, Mass. He believes that the amount of radioactivity detected was many times smaller than that of a dental X-ray. Mainstream media sources such as Reuters have also commented on the findings. Continue reading

Is Radioactive Water Worth Worrying About?

Whether any of this actually matters depends on whom you ask. “There’s a nuclear-power side that’s very quick to be dismissive and say, ‘Don’t worry your pretty little heads, you’re not in harm’s way,’ ” Ken Buesseler, a marine-chemistry researcher at Woods Hole and the organizer of the sampling initiative, told me. “The flip side are the people screaming, you know, ‘Stay out of the Pacific, don’t swim in Monterey, I’m going to move, tell your friends, this is a catastrophe!’ ” At the levels detected in Ucluelet, Buesseler has calculated, you’d need to swim six hours a day for a thousand years to get the radiation equivalent of a dental X-ray. Continue reading

Fukushima radiation detected off coast of B.C. 2

Trace amounts of radioactive isotopes from Fukushima power plant disaster have been detected along B.C.’s shoreline for the first time.

The traces were discovered Feb. 19 from samples collected in Ucluelet are well below internationally established levels of concern to humans and marine life, says the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Continue reading

Fukushima radioactive cesium reaches Canada

Scientists say that very little traces of toxic cesium-134 and cesium-137 from Fukushima nuclear power plant have been detected in Canada, Vancouver.

Cesium-137 has a half-life of 30 years, but cesium-134 has a half-life of just two years, indicating that the material detected in Vancouver is of recent vintage, and not a product of older nuclear waste, according to the international press. Continue reading

Fukushima radiation will reach California and Hawaii

Traces of radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant meltdown will be detectable at the Pacific coast, in April 2014.

According to a scientific model developed by Vincent Rossi, a post-doctoral research associate at the Institute for Cross-Disciplinary Physics and Complex Systems in Spain, traces of Fukushima’s radiation will reach Alaska and coastal Canada first. Continue reading