Iran Promises to Restart Nuclear Weapons Work as Tehran Identified as Top Global Threat

Head of the Atomic Energy Organisation of Iran Ali Akbar Salehi

Head of the Atomic Energy Organisation of Iran Ali Akbar Salehi / Getty Images

 

U.S. intel: Iran, Russia, China leading cyber charge against U.S.

Senior Iranian leaders on Thursday signaled the country is on the brink of restarting its contested nuclear weapons program, disclosing the Islamic Republic is prepared to restart the full-scale enrichment of uranium, the key component in a nuclear weapon, if it does not continue to receive cash windfalls from European countries still committed to the landmark nuclear agreement. Continue reading

Mysteries of HYPERSONIC super fighter jet that will ‘circle globe in 3 HOURS’ REVEALED

The Valkyrie II is expected to be in production within 10 to 20 years

HYPERSONIC: The Valkyrie II is expected to be in production within 10 to 20 years (BOEING/ FACEBOOK)

 

THE incredible first details about a hypersonic fighter jet that can blast enemy targets as it zaps around the world in three hours have been revealed.

Boffins first unveiled plans for the Valkyrie II last month, which they aim to build in the next 10 to 20 years. Continue reading

NATO Caught ‘Surprised’ By Russia’s Move Into Syria

This isn’t just a NATO problem, it’s an American problem.

It’s been oft mentioned here that it’s unclear which is scarier: The threats from every direction that a now-vulnerable America faces, or the fact that America’s unintelligent community is unable to see anything on their radar until after the fact. If it does get reported, then it’s manipulated into a happy story — because everything’s fine and just keep sho

 

Intelligence chief says the alliance members can’t even agree whether Moscow or ISIS is the greater threat — and there’s not enough ISR to go around.

When Russia sent military forces into Syria last weekend, it caught NATO by surprise and proved that its members can neither stay ahead of threats nor even decide which ones are the most pressing, the alliance’s intelligence director said.

“Are we keeping up with threats?…Absolutely not,” said U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Brett Heimbigner Thursday. “The demands for intelligence… to accurately deal with some of these crises is clearly insufficient.” Continue reading

China fast builds ‘counter-space’ capabilities to counter US satellites, Pentagon warns

“By the end of October 2014, China had launched 16 spacecraft, either domestically or via a commercial space launch provider. These spacecraft mostly expanded China’s SATCOM and ISR capabilities, while a few others tested new space technologies,” said the report detailing potential threats from China, which the US DoD released Friday.

Among the latest achievements by China the report mentions the first-ever launch of a satellite capable of sub-meter resolution imaging, the Chang’e-5 lunar mission and the completion of a new space launch facility on Hainan Island. Continue reading

The US starts feeding intelligence to Iran-led forces in Tikrit

The United States Monday began providing Iraqi forces fighting the Islamic State in Tikrit with critical surveillance and reconnaissance intelligence support, a Defense Department official disclosed.

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Pentagon Urged to Focus on ‘Great Power Conflict’ to Save Budget

Forget terrorism. The Pentagon’s best chance to field the best military with the smaller budget imposed by sequestration may just lie in preparing for nuclear war with Russia and China.

According to a new study, United States defense leaders should focus more on a “great power conflict” reflective of a newly aggressive Russia and rapidly modernizing China. Doing so would force the Defense Department to modernize its existing force and invest significantly in maintaining technological advantages at the expense of unlikely-to-be used ships, aircraft and soldiers. Among the arsenal the U.S. should keep: the full triad of bombers, submarines and intercontinental ballistic missiles meant to deter or carry out nuclear warfare.

While the space between Syria and Iraq commands headlines this month, it’s Moscow and Beijing that leads researchers to offer an unexpectedly “go big or go home” proposition for the U.S. military. The route offered on Wednesday by budget experts at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, or CSIS, calls for moving $10 billion from the procurement budget and “force structure,” (military jargon for the number of people in the military and all that is required to support them, roughly) and giving those funds to investments. The CSIS plan would increase the number of attack submarines at sea, significantly ramp-up surveillance in both air and space, and emphasize select ground troops like special operations forces and heavy infantry. The costs would be absorbed by a reduction in aircraft carriers, F-35 Joint Strike Fighters and the Air Force’s shorter-range aircraft. Continue reading

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