The Threat of Communism: Then and Now

https://www.theepochtimes.com/assets/uploads/2019/01/03/Soviet-era-dissident-Vladimir-Bukovsky.jpg

Soviet-era Dissident Vladimir Bukovsky speaks at an opposition meeting in Moscow, 17 December 2007. Bukovsky is a potential united oppostion candidate for president in Russia’s March 2008 presidential elections. AFP PHOTO / ALEXEY SAZONOV (Photo credit should read Alexey SAZONOV/AFP/Getty Images)

 

One of the most famous enemies of Soviet communism is Vladimir Bukovsky. He was tortured by Soviet authorities. He spent many years in Soviet prisons. He was even declared “insane” and sent to a psychiatric prison. When Bukovsky was exiled to the West, people paid lip service to his courage; but few heeded his warnings about Gorbachev’s Perestroika.

Bukovsky reminded everyone that all Soviet leaders were liars. Gorbachev, he said, was no exception—and was certainly no democrat. Like Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev, and Brezhnev, Gorbachev was a liar and a hangman. But hardly anyone listened. Everyone wanted to believe the Cold War was over.

But how could we have won the Cold War? This was the inconvenient question Bukovsky asked. Random House senior editor Jason Epstein rejected Bukovsky’s question altogether. And so, Bukovsky’s book on the equivocal “fall of communism” was not published in English—until now.

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Welcome to Soviet America! (Was my 1975 1-act play prophetic?)

On our arrival to the United States, after I published my book “The Education of Lev Navrozov: A Life in the Closed World Once Called Russia,” I embarked on a world lecture tour, explaining the Soviet criminal system. First it was American university audiences, then Canada, South America, Japan, France, and Italy. The response in the press was very enthusiastic. And yet, I was not satisfied. Something else had to be done — with some visual effects.

I could not fail to notice that my message to explain the harm to freedom and democracy done by the liberal, socialist ideas was appreciated mostly by conservative audiences (the Yale Conservative party, New York’s East Side Conservative Club, and the like), while the liberal press pursued their own agenda.

My first attack was on the liberal New York Times, which for years concealed from the American public the atrocities perpetrated by the Stalin regime.

Stalin’s best friend was Walter Duranty of the New York Times. For decades, the newspaper carried his dispatches from Moscow, repeating Soviet propaganda, depicting happy lives of the people in “Stalin’s paradise,” which were outright lies and concealed the ugly truth and suffering of the Russian people enslaved by Stalin’s criminal henchmen. Continue reading