Germany Could Lose €80 Billion if Greece Goes Bankrupt

Are you starting to see who has the most to lose in the Eurozone crisis? If so, you see why Greece might not go. If Greek can’t pay, the German banks cannot survive. Germany is also exposed to $72 trillion in derivatives whereas the nation’s GDP is roughly $2.7 trillion, to put it in perspective. The stakes are high and Greece might have the upper hand after all.

 

Head of Bundestag Committee on European Union Affairs predicts that Germany could lose billions of euros if Greece goes bankrupt.

Athens may not be able to return €80 billion of economic aid that it received from Germany in case of bankruptcy, Deutsche Welle wrote. Continue reading

Greece Abandons “Red Lines” As Troika Meets In Berlin To Craft “Deal”

We’ve been saying for months that the troika’s ultimate goal in negotiations with Greek PM Alexis Tsipras is to use financial leverage to force Syriza into abandoning its campaign mandate, thus sending a strong message to the EU periphery’s other ascendant socialists that threatening to disprove the idea of ‘euro indissolubility’ is not a viable bargaining strategy when it comes to extracting austerity concessions from creditors.

Over the past several days the political situation has come to a head with Tsipras expressing his extreme displeasure at the troika’s “coordinated leaks” and unwillingness to give even an inch on what the PM calls “absurd” demands. Continue reading

Greece counts down to default after Tsipras slams EU demands as ‘unreasonable’

Greece has become deadlocked with its international creditors just days before a potential default as its leaders were accused of “playing with the future of the country”.

Meanwhile Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras said that Greece was not to blame for the lack of a deal. In an op-ed in French paper Le Monde this weekend, he blamed “the obsession of some institutional representatives who insist on unreasonable solutions and are being indifferent to the democratic result of recent Greek elections”.

The debt-laden nation must pay back €304m (£218m) in loans due to the International Monetary Fund on Friday, but is struggling to reach a deal with the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the IMF needed to unlock €7.2bn in vital funds due under its second bailout in 2012. Continue reading

Greece could use ‘parallel currency’ as desperation grows

As was said three years ago, this seems like the safest option in a worst-case scenario. If this backdoor method gains traction in Greece, it would no doubt help avoid a Russian and Chinese invasion via Athens and full economic breakup of the single currency bloc. Other embattled countries might string along.

 

European Central Bank board member floats the idea of an “IOU” system to pay civil servants if country runs out of euros

Greece could start using a “parallel currency” to pay its civil servants if it runs out of cash, one of the European Central Bank’s board members has suggested. His comments come as the country scrambles to reach a deal with international creditors and avoid a default.

Highlighting the desperate situation faced by the country, Yves Merch, a member of the ECB’s executive board and governor of Luxembourg’s central bank, told Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia that Greece could resort to using “exceptional tools” to pay its obligations.

Continue reading

Greece to finalise airports deal ‘immediately’ – source

…and Greek further capitulates to Germany’s Fourth Reich. If they ever get tired of being a German vassal state and decide to go with the economic ‘nuclear option’, don’t be shocked to find Russian military bases and Chinese owned shipping ports within Greek territory.

 

(Reuters) – Greece will finalise “immediately” a 1.2-billion-euro (£883.2 million) deal with Fraport (FRAG.DE) to run regional airports and reopen bidding for a majority stake in Piraeus port (Rolph.AT), a senior privatisations official said on Tuesday.

The asset sales had been in doubt after Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’ leftist-led government took power in January but may be the latest concessions offered by his government to try to secure more bailout cash from international creditors. Continue reading

The ECB Is Considering A Parallel Greek Currency

As mentioned here many times for a long time, a “currency A” and “currency B” situation could be coming. This would likely be the best hedge in keeping Greece from going 110% Communist and allowing Russia to further creep into Europe, up from 100% when the Alexis Tsipras government took hold of the country. This will also keep the EU, at least for the short-term, from imploding.

 

As we first reported yesterday, one of the proposed measures to be implemented in Greece just before, or during its default and/or exit from the Eurozone, in addition to pervasive capital controls of course, is the implementation of a parallel “currency”, or as explained yesterday, a government paying its citizens with IOUs.

This is what we said less than 24 hours ago: Continue reading

ECB blocks banks from using Greek debt as collateral

FRANKFURT–The European Central Bank said Wednesday it would suspend a waiver it had extended to Greek public securities used as collateral by the country’s financial institutions for central bank loans. Continue reading