Alan Greenspan: Investors should prepare for the worst

https://cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/181218090824-alan-greenspan2-exlarge-169.jpg

 

Alan Greenspan says the party’s over on Wall Street.

The former Federal Reserve chairman who famously warned more than two decades ago about “irrational exuberance” in the stock market doesn’t see equity prices going any higher than they are now.

“It would be very surprising to see it sort of stabilize here, and then take off,” Greenspan said in an interview with CNN anchor Julia Chatterley. Continue reading

2015.75 was Just the Beginning

 

QUESTION: Hello Mr Armstrong

I have not forgotten when I saw the reportage about you on TV when you announced that in October 2015 will start the big economic collapse. do you think that that date was bit early or really there is some thing happened?
Continue reading

Don’t Be Fooled – The Federal Reserve Will Continue Rate Hikes Despite Crisis

 

Though stock markets in general are meaningless and indicate nothing in terms of the health of the economy they still function as a form of hypnosis, or a kind of Pavlovian mechanism; a tool that central bankers can use to keep a population servile and salivating at the ring of a bell. As I have mentioned in the past, the only two elements of the economy that the average person pays attention to in the slightest are the unemployment rate and the Dow. As long as the first is down and the second is up, they aren’t going to take a second look at the health of our financial system. Continue reading

Yellen’s Shocking Announcement: The $USD is TOAST

 

Fed Chair Janet Yellen just announced that the Fed will be kicking the $USD off a cliff.

She didn’t use those words, but the words she did use weren’t all that different.

But first a little context… Continue reading

The Forgotten Depression of 1920–1921

 

The year is 1921…

America is less than three years removed from triumph on the Western Front. It’s the dawn of the Roaring Twenties… and the Jazz Age.

Warren Gamaliel Harding is America’s czar.

And the nation is sunk in depression Continue reading

Here’s the one word in Janet Yellen’s speech that the markets should be very worried about

Please see the source for the video.

 

The stock market has churned a bit in the last few days. Some Wall Street wags have suggested that concerns over the President’s tweet storm over the weekend, or North Korea’s missile firings, may have been behind the stall in the market.

Certainly, political uncertainty, and geo-political risk, have caused some consternation in global markets, while concerns about the pace of gains in stocks, coupled with perceived lofty valuations have also provided a mild headwind on Wall Street in the last few days.

While the market appears to be happily embracing a coming rates hike from the Federal Reserve, it seems to me that market participants may have glossed over a very important comment from Fed Chair, Janet Yellen, last Friday. Continue reading

Warning Signs a Stock Market Crash Is Coming

The Dow has soared 13% since Election Day, and just last week (Feb. 10), all three major indexes closed at all-time highs. The “Trump Rally” has been great for stocks, but some observers are starting to wonder if soaring highs mean a stock market crash is coming.

No one can predict a stock market crash with 100% certainty. But we want our readers to be as informed as possible about what could happen in the market.

That’s why we’re looking into historic stock market crashes to identify warning signs that can be used now. Continue reading

Fed Fakes Confidence With Another Dec. 1/4 Point Rate Hike

Continue reading

Central banks ‘have never been on thinner ice’

Banks are in over their heads in trouble. Central banks are over their heads in trouble as well. The only thing left to bail them all out would be the IMF — which is within the realm of possibility as we enter a harsh downturn.

 

Sentiment at IMF annual meeting sours on Fed, BOJ, ECB

The global financial elite has soured on global central bank policy, believing that it’s now counterproductive, doing more harm than good.

That was the message on the sidelines of the International Monetary Fund’s annual meeting in Washington, where in informal survey of more than 100 bankers found more than 70% saying monetary policy is now part of the problem instead of a solution. Continue reading

The Fed Is Set to Slaughter Debt-Laden U.S. Oil Producers

Of course the preeminent question is whether the Fed will raise interest rates soon. But either way, the U.S. energy sector, already under pressure, is about to feel a whole lot more of it – no matter when the Fed raises rates, or how many times it raises them in 2016.

In fact, no matter how you slice it, a wide swath of American oil and natural gas producers are going to catch it in the neck; bankruptcies, mergers and acquisitions, and of course asset sales (one step ahead of the sheriff) will be the order of the day.

This much chaos and consolidation means one thing: There are big profit opportunities for those who tread carefully… Continue reading

The Death of the Euro

At last year’s WEC, we warned that the collapse of the euro was underway. We achieved the Yearly Bearish Reversal on the close of 2015, but we did so far below the number. We had been waiting for the rally to retest the 11600 level, which we finally achieved. The ECB monetary policy has been typical banker nonsense and has brought Europe closer to a major financial crash. Draghi has applied the unsupported quantity of money theory and assumes he will simply buy in the debt and the cash will miraculously be spent wildly by consumers. Trading volumes and the velocity of money have been falling in general since 1996-1998. The low to negative interest rate policy of the ECB has endangered pensions and ailing banks, and this is just now beginning to push pensions and banks over the edge. Draghai will not admit he is wrong, so he will blame everyone other than himself. Continue reading

Central Banks Are Trapped – Are Higher Interest Rates the Only Answer?

COMMENT: Marty, well it looks like you have done it. The central banks are going to start raising interest rates right in line with your model. It is interesting how your computer puts the entire world before you to see. Keep up the good work. They obviously are starting to follow you.

SS Continue reading

Opinion: How negative interest rates take money out of your pocket

Negative interest rates, which central banks in several countries have implemented as a way to spur economic growth, is a radical move. In the last of a three-part series, ‘Negative Thinking,’ commentator Satyajit Das examines this policy and its risks.

Low rates are supposed to encourage debt-financed consumption and investment, feeding a virtuous cycle of expansion. They also increase wealth, encouraging spending. Low rates and abundant liquidity should drive inflation.

Instead, these policies since 2008 have brought the global economy a precarious stability at best, and have not created economic growth or inflation. Continue reading

Germany Unveils “Cash Controls” Push: Ban Transactions Over €5,000, €500 Euro Note

We’ve documented the cash ban calls on a number of occasions including, most recently, those that emanated from DNB, Norway’s largest bank where executive Trond Bentestuen said that although “there is approximately 50 billion kroner in circulation, the Norges Bank can only account for 40 percent of its use.”

That, Bentestuen figures, “means that 60 percent of money usage is outside of any control.” “We believe,” he continues, “that is due to under-the-table money and laundering.”

DNB goes on to say that after identifying “many dangers and disadvantages” associated with cash, the bank has “concluded that it should be phased out.” Continue reading

WORLD IN FINANCIAL MELTDOWN: Global economy set for recession WORSE than 2008

BRITAIN and the world could be about to enter a recession that will be more brutal than 2008 thanks to China’s slowing economy, experts fear.

China’s has the second largest economy in the world and represents around 12 per cent of global GDP and 18 per cent of global manufacturing exports.

At the same time, it has built up huge levels of debt within its stock market helping to create a huge bubble that now looks set to burst.  Continue reading