China Prepares To Dominate South Pacific With Week Of Electronic Warfare Drills

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While the Trump administration unveiling another round of tariffs on Chinese goods worth $200 billion – for which China’s Commerce Ministry is planning “countermeasures,” Beijing quietly began conducting military drills at five bases for electronic warfare, cybersecurity, reconnaissance and tactical strikes at five training bases, reports the South China Morning Post.

Over 50 combat units consisting of around 2,100 officers are taking part in the war games, which includes airborne troops, special forces and electronic warfare experts from the Northern, Southern, Eastern, Western and Central command theatres, according to official accounts over social media. Continue reading

‘700 tonnes’ of sodium cyanide reportedly in warehouse during deadly Tianjin blasts

 70 times the normal amount of cyanide is needed for what, exactly?

 

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An aerial view of the crater after Wednesday’s blasts. Photo: EPA

 

Chinese officials investigate claims of sodium cyanide 70 times more than the permitted amount stored at Ruihai site

A large discrepancy over the precise quantity of hazardous chemicals being stored at a warehouse in the port area of Tianjin at the time of Wednesday night’s two deadly blasts is just one of the many unanswered questions surrounding the tragedy, which has claimed at least 85 lives.

Southern Metropolis News has reported that 700 tonnes of sodium cyanide – a highly toxic substance that can kill rapidly if inhaled – were being stored the warehouse owned by Ruihai International Logistics, according to a claim by the owner of a Hebei chemical company that owned the substance – 70 times the permitted amount.

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China plans cross-strait highways with Taiwan

Beijing drafts plan for symbolic bridge, but lacks approval from Taiwanese authorities

The mainland government has recently approved a national road project that includes two cross-strait highways linking both sides of the Taiwan Strait.

If completed, the project would be a literal and figurative bridge between the mainland and Taiwan and would mark a major milestone in cross-strait relations.

However, Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council, the island’s top cross-strait policy planning body, told the South China Morning Post the project had been “unilaterally worked out by mainland authorities“.

“Based on national security concerns and cross-strait interactions, we have not planned anything with such high political sensitivity and complexity,” the council said, spelling out the island’s political and security concerns. Continue reading