Greece bailout: Europe turns up pressure as cash runs out

ECB looks at restricting emergency lending to Greek banks

More pressure has been heaped upon Athens, as reports suggested the European Central Bank is looking at placing greater restrictions on the use of its emergency lending facilities by Greece’s domestic banks.

Greek banks have tapped around €74bn (£53bn) in emergency liquidity assistance from the ECB to replace the deposits that nervous domestic savers have pulled out of the financial system in recent months. Without that lifeline, the country’s banks would rapidly collapse. Continue reading

Greece: The Big Picture Update, And Why Deutsche Bank Thinks Europe Will Fold

Eight possible scenarios if Greece defaults and leaves the Eurozone

A look at possible scenarios if Greece defaults and leaves the Eurozone:

2. Bank runs

Regular citizens will empty their bank accounts before they converted into a new currency worth less than the previous one. The government may impose a freeze on withdrawal and banks from other countries that have lent to Greece could also collapse. Continue reading

The Greek Bank Runs Have Begun: Two Greek Banks Request Emergency Liquidity Assistance

The first time the phrase Emergency Liquidity Assistance, or ELA, was used in the context of Greece was in August 2011, when Greece was imploding, when its banking sector was on (and past) the verge of collapse, and just before the ECB had to unleash a global coordinated bailout with other central banks including global central bank liquidity swap and unleash the LTRO to preserve the Eurozone.

As a reminder, this is what happened back then: “In a move described as the “last stand for Greek banks”, the embattled country’s central bank activated Emergency Liquidity Assistance (ELA) for the first time on Wednesday night.”

“Although it was done discreetly, news that Athens had opened the fund filtered out and was one of the factors that rattled markets across Europe. At one point Germany’s Dax was down 4pc before it recovered. The ELA was designed under European rules to allow national central banks to provide liquidity for their own lenders when they run out of collateral of a quality that can be used to trade with the ECB. It is an obscure tool that is supposed to be temporary and one of the last resorts for indebted banks.” Continue reading