Russia’s stake in Korea: How U.S.-backed unification could work for Moscow

We hear so much about China and Japan competing on and for the Korean peninsula, now and historically, that we overlook one other great Northeast Asian power.

That would be Russia, which has a 17-kilometer border with North Korea as the Tumen River flows into the sea. Continue reading

What Russia is up to in Syria and the ‘progressive’ U.S. suicide

As oft said here, America is suiciding itself, and in more ways than this article states.

Note: As in other rare cases when an article deserves special recognition, a majority of this article will stay posted here. Still be sure to click the source link for the full article.

 

A new round of the “Great Game”* in Syria demonstrates not so much Moscow’s growing power, as the intellectual vacuum in the West.

Western leaders, the media and experts state the obvious: the Kremlin is trying to save Assad. Of course, yes, but principal points remain outside of the focus of their attention.

It is not only about Syria. It’s about two polar ideologies, two worldviews that are incompatible with each other. Continue reading

The new Great Game: Europe looks within for roots of renewal

Exactly what was predicted here long ago as a potential outcome is now stated in this article: The EU will eventually break up into a two tier hiearchy. Also mentioned was the Mediterranean nations being a source of gas and oil to fuel and rebuild Europe’s economy, which is why Greece and Cyprus have been subjugated into EU vassal states and likely will remain on board any future EU integration — they’re too strategically important to lose. The United States of Europe is indeed coming.

The term “the Great Game” referred to the strategic rivalry between the British and Russian empires in Central Asia. Today’s Great Game is the battle for economic survival in a world of low economic growth. In such a world economic nationalism reasserts itself, reducing free trade in goods and services and free movement of capital. Escalating sovereign debt and banking sector problems will favour European introspection.

Individual European economies are modest in size relative to the US. But as a single entity the European Union, including the 17-member eurozone, accounts for more than 25 per cent of global GDP, making it the world’s largest economic unit. Continue reading

Global “great power politics” returns to Mideast

“What we are seeing is the U.S. losing its ability to shape events in the region, even though it remains by far the pre-eminent military power,” says Waleed Hazbun, director of the Centre for Arab and Middle Eastern Studies at the American University in Beirut.

“You’re seeing others moving in to fill the gap.”

In some ways, experts say, there are echoes of 19th and 20th century scrambles for resources, territory and influence.

“Bottom line: there will be more players in the sandbox,” says Hayat Alvi, lecturer in Middle Eastern studies at the US Naval War College. “The Middle East has always been the venue for the “Great Game.”.. Rising powers will see opportunities and advantages in engaging in (that), just like the colonial powers.”

Continue reading article: Global “great power politics” returns to Mideast (Reuters)