Under German Command

BERLIN/THE HAGUE/WARSAW (Own report) – The German Bundeswehr has announced the formation of a permanent military unit of foreigners under German command. Beginning in January 2014, approx. 2,100 soldiers from the Netherlands will be integrated into the “Rapid Reaction Force Division” as a result of a declaration of intent signed in Berlin last week by the defense ministers of both countries. Three dozen projects for closer cooperation between the two armed forces are planned. A second, similar declaration of intent, stipulating closer naval cooperation was also signed between the defense ministers of Germany and Poland. This cooperation includes combat missions. Specialists in military policy have been calling for intensifying military cooperation to increase the Bundeswehr’s military clout. Berlin would be well advised to seek cooperation particularly with the smaller countries, because they, it is said, unlike France or Great Britain, are more pliable allies due to their lesser power potentials. Continue reading

Breath-Taking Progress

What you see here is the notion that without humans in combat, there’s less risk involved, therefore there is stronger public support for the usage of UAVs in war, and war itself. Such might be the current situation in America today, as it’s waging 74+ wars, both declared and undeclared. If there’s no human intervention (i.e. drone strikes) or a small teams of special ops are being used, it’s not thought of as a war.

BERLIN (Own report) – The German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP) is propagating in favor of the deployment of combat drones. The influential think tank, headquartered in Berlin, has published an opinion poll indicating that more than two-thirds of the German population are in favor of using Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicles or UCAVs in warfare. The results of this poll can be found in the current edition of “Internationale Politik,” the journal published by the DGAP. The journal extensively treats the subject – with an unambiguous tenor: UCAV development is characterized as an “enormous technological leap” that the German armed forces cannot evade. The authors consider the construction of combat drones, which, based on artificial intelligence can quasi “autonomously” carry out killer functions without human intervention, to be a “logical consequence.” The PR campaign, launched by the DGAP, accords with the German government’s intention to increase the reliance on UCAVs in future wars. Continue reading

‘Credible Deterrence’: Germany Plans to Deploy Armed Drones

First comes the merging of states via political and social solidarity. Then, next is the “European Army” member nations have been calling for. Sometime later, and through an upcoming “United States of Europe” lead and dominated by Germany, meet your new king of the northern hemisphere and next world superpower. Some who say China would be the next might be in for a huge surprise.

A document obtained by SPIEGEL ONLINE indicates the German government is preparing to procure armed drones for foreign combat. Opposition politicians are outraged by the development and note that the use of weapons-equipped unmanned aircraft is legally dubious and possibly unethical.

Bowing to pressure from the German armed forces, the Bundeswehr, the federal government in Berlin is preparing to deploy armed, unmanned drones in foreign conflicts. In an answer to an official query made by the far-left Left Party, which has been obtained by SPIEGEL ONLINE, the German government wrote that its experience in foreign combat operations has made it clear that reconnaissance vehicles must be armed “in order to provide protection against sudden and serious changes in the situation.” Continue reading

Desert War

BERLIN/PARIS/BAMAKO (Own report) – The German Foreign Minister has confirmed Berlin’s readiness to become involved in the war in Mali. To his French counterpart, Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, Guido Westerwelle offered Germany’s “political, logistical, medical, and humanitarian” support for the intervention in France’s former colony. However, the German Minister of Defense, Thomas de Maizière, declared that there would be conditions to be met. Only when “the prerequisites are clarified and fulfilled” would Berlin be able to take part in the military mission. These statements from the German government show evidence of a dual strategy. On the one hand, Berlin is insisting on concessions to strengthen its position in French-dominated West Africa, and on the other, a German participation is supposed to thwart French-British unilateralism, as in the case of Libya. Berlin feels threatened by this sort of unilateralism, because since some time, Paris and London have been strongly enhancing their military cooperation, leading some in the German capital to suspect – not without reason – that this could be a means to escape Germany’s EU predomination, at least in the domain of military policy. In the meantime, the war in Mali has intensified after only a few days. Continue reading

China and Germany Strengthen Cooperation With Nigeria

As America grapples with the fiscal cliff, China and Germany are increasing their military presence in an African nation vital to global seaborne trade.

Just last August, the Chinese military had discussions with the Nigerian government to upgrade the Nigerian Navy. During the discussions, Chinese military attaché to Nigeria, Kang Honglin, pointed to the fact that China has already helped Nigeria set up an ammunition assembly line. He then went on to talk about China’s desire to provide the Nigerian Navy with both the training and equipment necessary to secure the Gulf of Guinea. Continue reading

Leading Nation of a Belligerent Europe

BERLIN/PARIS (Own report) – German government advisors are pleading for the creation of a joint German-French air force. In light of an alleged “deterioration of EU military efficiency,” the “two major nations” in Europe are “required to take the leadership,” according to a position paper published by the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP). “Clear signals” must finally be given and “concrete proposals for security policy cooperation” presented, rather than non-binding declarations of intent. For example, a fusion of the air forces of Germany and France would provide a good opportunity for promoting military as well as arms industry cooperation. Experts in Berlin have been complaining since some time that the desperately needed cooperation of the arms industries throughout the EU still has not really materialized, despite persistent political appeals. Aside from the advantages for the arms industry, this plea for the creation of a German-French air force is aimed at the recent French-British military cooperation, considered in Berlin as a means for preventing a German predominance of the EU’s war policy. Practical measures have now been taken to split the British-French alliance. Continue reading

German Military Returning to Its Role at the Center of Society

Relaxing arms trading rules, testing tanks in Saudi Arabia and an initiative to put the German Army “at the center of society” show the German military and arms manufacturers becoming increasingly important to the nation.

The German Army has launched efforts to put the army at the center of society, while Der Spiegel reports that the government is planning to make it easier for arms manufactures to export.

The Economy Ministry has drafted two papers that aim to “lift special German rules which disadvantage German exporters in comparison to their European competitors,” making it easier for Germany to export weapons, Der Spiegel reported July 15.

A spokesman from the ministry denied the report, saying that the new rules would not affect arms trade. However, Der Spiegel insists its reporting is accurate.

According to the magazine, the rules would mean that weapons sales within the European Union would no longer be considered exports, but transfers. This would mean that arms exporters could sell their weapons around the world by transferring them to other countries and then exporting them using the simpler EU rules. The changes will also make fines for those caught violating the rules less strict.

Germany is already the world’s third-largest exporter. On the same day as Der Spiegel’s exposé was published, Bild reported that Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems signed a €400 million deal with Algeria for two frigates, with helicopters. Included in the deal was extensive training of Algerian soldiers by the German military.

Earlier in the month, Spiegel Online reported that the German Army is already helping the manufacturers of the Leopard Tank test their tanks in Saudi Arabia. The sale of 270 “ultra-modern” Leopard 2 tanks to Saudi Arabia is unpopular and controversial. The fact that it has been pushed through and that the deal is being supported by the German Army shows the political will beside it. The German government continues to arm Saudi Arabia—one of Iran’s most steadfast enemies.

Indonesia is also reported to be interested in buying 100 Leopard 2 tanks.

German arms exports have grown rapidly in recent years, making arms sales increasingly important for German trade and foreign policy.

As Germany returns to its traditional role as an expert arms manufacturer, former Defense Minister Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg’s decision to end conscription is changing the army’s relationship with society.

It now has to attract recruits just like any other employer, which means that for the first time since World War ii, the Defense Ministry is working hard to sell the army to the general public.

Current Defense Minister Thomas de Maiziere recently outlined its efforts in a speech, titled “The Army in the Middle of Our Society,” to the Institute of Communication Science at the Dresden University of Technology. The army, he said, must increase its “social esteem,” so that it is viewed as a good and honorable profession.

From the creation of a unified German state in 1871 until the end of World War ii, the army was at the center of society. Until the end of World War i, Germany was essentially a military state. Between the wars, the army was the real master of the nation, quietly preparing for another conflict.

Because of this history, many have striven to ensure the Germany Army is the servant of the state, not its master. It has been pushed away from government. But efforts to bring the army back into the center of society could revive a latent military tradition.

Watch for the Germany Army to be raised high in the esteem of Germans, as trust in politicians and the government plummets. And watch for the arms industry to become increasingly important for Germany’s economy and foreign policy.

These events are fundamentally changing society’s relationship with the army. This relationship is what you should watch most of all. The same military that planned two world wars will soon once again play a bigger role in German society.

Full article: German Military Returning to Its Role at the Center of Society (The Trumpet)

European Armies Recruiting Muslim Soldiers

Germany is seeking to recruit more Muslims into its army: it cannot find enough native Germans to fill its ranks after it abolished the draft.

German Defense Minister Thomas de Maizière announced his intention to “multiculturalize” the German Bundeswehr (Federal Defense Force) during a June 20 headhunting mission to the Turkish capital Ankara, where he declared: “I want the [German] army to be representative of a cross-section of the German population.”

Germany formally discontinued compulsory military service on July 1, 2011 as part of a comprehensive reform aimed at creating a smaller and more agile army of about 185,000 professional soldiers.

But during its first twelve months of existence, Germany’s new all-volunteer army has been unable to meet its recruiting goals, and military manpower prospects look dim for the foreseeable future.

In a desperate search for soldiers, German military officials have now identified Germany’s Muslim Turkish population (3.5 million and counting) as a new source for potential recruits.

Muslim immigrants now represent an estimated 15% of all French military personnel (exact figures are unavailable; French law prohibits collecting data on religious affiliation). In real terms, there are around 30,000 active duty Muslims out of a total of 220,000 military personnel in the French Armed Forces.

Much of the debate about the issue of Muslims serving in the French military has revolved around the hypothetical question of how to predict the loyalty of Muslim troops in cases where the French military is involved in armed conflict with Muslim countries.

The issue of troop loyalty was brought to the fore following the Muslim riots in the suburbs of Paris and other French cities in October and 2005. The riots affected 274 French towns and cities and caused more than €200 million in property damage – as rioters burned 8,973 vehicles and hundreds of buildings.

At the time, French authorities were concerned that the riots might expand into a nationwide uprising of Muslims throughout the country; they were trying to forecast the behavior of Muslim soldiers in the case that the French army would be called upon to restore order.

Some surveys of Muslim immigrants in French suburbs show that fewer than 10% of respondents consider themselves French and just 1% say they are willing to die for France.

Full article: European Armies Recruiting Muslim Soldiers (Gatestone Institute)

On the Relevance of Democracy

What seems to be an economic crisis is actually a premeditated assault via economic warfare in attempt to subjugate sovereign nations — and Greece is only the first.

When you hear Germany, Europe’s leader, speaking about stabilizing Greece, it means the desired result is capitulation and relinquishing of sovereignty in exchange to stay afloat just a little while longer — all for the United States of Europe project that was destined to fail from the beginning. Yet, they continue to push forward, piece by piece. What’s more, it was conceived to fail and it was known it would fail. The failure was only the tool for reshaping the continent to German will. In the case of Greece, the German government is well aware of the difficulty of convincing Greeks to willingly relinquish their national sovereignty. Therefore, the only way to achieve unification, without war, is through stealth. The people must not know that sovereignty is being and has been surrendered until it is gone.

Greece is only the beginning and the public is being prepped for possible military intervention should a the (planned outcome) crisis spin further out of control (hint, hint). We’re still yet to see what will become of the other largest economies in Europe such as Spain and Italy who see Greece’s fate as a benchmark. Furthermore, perhaps we may not see the same defiance with these since they are more compliant and politically allied. France has been known to toe the German line for quite some time now.

The same desired outcome with a twist, and a different game plan is in play.

As one article puts it:

Europe’s leaders are on the cusp of a unification project that will turn the disparate nations of Europe into a true superpower. As Europe’s debt woes increase, so too will the desire for further integration—at any cost. With each crisis, Germany’s position is strengthened. If unification is to proceed, it will be on German terms.

Those who are tuned out to reality or see the economic crisis for what it is only at face value on the evening news, this may seem highly unlikely, unfounded, ridiculous or even appauling.

For those who are tuned in: Make no mistake. Under a German-dominated EU superstate, the Fourth Reich is here.

ATHENS/BERLIN (Own report) – In the run-up to new elections in Greece, the German elite is discussing various scenarios involving the use of force to ensure control over Athens, including the establishment of a protectorate or the deployment of “protection forces” in that southern European country. The German austerity dictate, pushing Greece into destitution, is provoking growing popular resistance, which, apparently, can no longer be suppressed with democratic means. Berlin has failed in its efforts to force Athens into subordination by threatening to withdraw the Euro, as much as with its demand that Greece combines its parliamentary elections with a referendum on the question of remaining in the Euro zone. Berlin categorically rejects the option of retracting the austerity dictate and replacing it with stimulus programs, as is being demanded by leading economists world wide, even though the exclusion of Greece form the Euro zone threatens to push the currency, itself, into an abyss.

No Right to Respect

In addition, Berlin has obviously applied pressure on Athens to combine a referendum on remaining in the Euro zone with the elections. This tactic is aimed at weakening the opponents of austerity. According to reports, German Finance Minster Schäuble made this proposal already last Monday to his Greek counterpart at the meeting of the Euro finance ministers.[2] This proposal is obviously supported by the Chairman of the CDU/CSU parliamentary group in the Bundestag, Volker Kauder (“Now German will be spoken in Europe” [3]). A Greek government spokesman confirmed that Chancellor Angela Merkel urged Greek President Karolos Papoulias last Friday to implement the German plan for a Greek referendum, whereas in November 2011, Berlin briskly rebuffed the Prime Minister at the time, Giorgos Papandreou, when he publicly announced his proposal to hold a referendum. This led to his demise. Berlin’s open interference is met with outrage in Athens. The Greek population has a “right to respect,” the chairperson of the conservative Nea Dimokratia, Antonis Samaras, was quoted as saying. And the chairman of the opposition party Syriza, Alexis Tsipras, declared that Berlin is acting as if Greece “is a protectorate.”[4]

Protectorate

The sectors of the German elite, which refuse to consider this change of course proposed by Krugman and numerous other experts outside Germany,[7] are now publicly debating scenarios involving the use of force. In a newspaper interview early this month, the director of the prominent Hamburg Institute of International Economics, Thomas Straubhaar, called for establishing a protectorate in Greece – “regardless of the outcome of the elections.” The country is a “failed state,” he says, which is unable to raise itself “to a new start” under “its own steam.”[8] Athens needs “help in establishing viable state structures.” It, therefore, must be transformed into “a European protectorate.” “The EU must do it,” affirms Straubhaar. The EU “would have to help Greece modernize its institutions at every level, particularly with administrative staff, tax experts, and tax inspectors.” However, refounding Greece would demand “intuition” to “overcome national pride, conceit, and the resistance of interest groups.” This is referring to a sovereign democracy, a German ally in the EU and NATO.

Protection Forces

Last week, a leading German daily discussed the issue of dispatching troops to Greece. Should the country go bankrupt, it would then, as a “‘failing state,’ (…) be less in a position” to shore up its borders against migrants, writes the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. Just recently, the EU Commission announced that it finds itself forced to prolong the mission of its EU border troops at the Greek/Turkish borders. If Athens “should no longer be able to pay its officials, or can pay only in Drachmas,” the situation risks “chaotic.”[11] The country could possibly “be rocked by rebellions.” “Help for Greece would then no longer be on credit, but be transformed into a sort of humanitarian emergency aid,” prophesied the journal in its front-page lead editorial. “Hopefully, an international protection force, such as is stationed in the teetering countries further to the north, will not become an option.”[12]

Full article: On the Relevance of Democracy (German Foreign Policy)

With Submarines against Pirates

This is also another reason that the Soviets, Chinese and Germans patrol the open seas and hunt pirates that articles won’t normally mention. The primary goal is not the pirate hunting itself. Aside from “maritime trade” routes, the primary goal can also be territorial claim and control of strategic waterways once you establish a regular patrol routine. Another benefit for these countries is that it’s free training for the military and even weapons testing without having an actual war. The pirates could’ve have been hunted down in their own country or a war between nations would have happened by now should they be an actual threat.

These militarization plans are certainly not a reaction merely to considerations of how to combat more effectively piracy off the coast of Somalia, but to geostrategic considerations as well. For example, last year Volker Perthes, Director of SWP, pointed out that the “interests” behind the countries’ sending their naval vessels to the Horn of Africa are not “limited to the war on piracy.” Perthes explains that, over the past few years, the importance of the Indian Ocean, where piracy is being fought in its western sector, has enormously grown. “One third of the world’s maritime trade” crosses this route, with the trend rising rapidly. Particularly East Asian countries, especially China, are making large infrastructure investments in the bordering countries – port facilities or transportation means -, which are “also elements of the geostrategic competition.” It is, after all, “it goes without saying” that China and even India have “an interest in protecting their maritime links.” Even though the United States “will remain the strongest maritime power in the Indian Ocean, for the foreseeable future,” it will soon “no longer be the sole maritime power.” Perthes warns that “the new momentum in the greater region of the Indian Ocean” should not be neglected and one must also be involved.[6]

Full article: With Submarines against Pirates (German Foreign Policy)

Germany May Reintroduce Veterans Day for the First Time Since World War II

“As the war generation dies out, the defense minister believes that the time is ready for Germany to come of age as a nation and commemorate the work done by its modern armed forces,” writes the Times. It writes that, for Germany, the move would “end one of its last postwar taboos.”

The proposals are supported by the German Army and the ruling Christian Democratic Union.

Full article: Germany May Reintroduce Veterans Day for the First Time Since World War II (The Trumpet)