German Plan to Bully EU Nations with Financial Penalties

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[Westmonster]

 

Another step towards a United States of Europe.

First they throw their weight behind an EU army and now they’re lobbying Brussels to withdraw funding from any country that doesn’t conform to the bloc’s unified set of laws.

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The Only Remaining Boom Sector

Germany will now control Greek infrastructure for 40 years, via a majority state-owned company. If anyone questions a resurgent Germany and its conquest of Europe again, they need to reassess and look at the hard evidence. It isn’t called the Fourth Reich here loosely.

BERLIN/ATHENS (Own report) – The German Fraport Company is preparing, under very strong protests from Greek trade unionists, to take over the operation and management of 14 of Greece’s airports. The concessions, which Fraport was awarded back in late 2015, will entrust the German company with the operational and management functioning of Greece’s most profitable regional airports – for a duration of 40 years. Annual profits are estimated to begin at 90 million Euros. The Greek state with retain 23 regional airports, including several that are in acute deficit, but must still be expensively maintained, as links between remote islands and the Greek mainland. One of the most powerful Greek oligarchs has a share not only in Fraport’s profits from the current takeover, but has for years been involved in operating the Pulkovo Airport in St. Petersburg. Fraport is one of the few German companies still investing in Greece. Many others are withdrawing from the country. The country’s crisis had led to a massive reduction in consumption, which does not permit attractive profits. The most important exception to this rule is the tourism sector, from which the Fraport airports can make profits in processing vacation flights. Continue reading

Germany Wants European Army

Such an army would fulfill Bible prophecy

But is having Germany in the driver’s seat of a European army cause for concern?

On October 30, German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen signed a declaration of intent on German-Polish cooperation with Polish Defense Minister Tomasz Siemoniak. This declaration of intent is not limited to training drills but provides for “placing combat battalions under the other’s command.” After the agreement, von der Leyen’s ministry declared the “German-Polish cooperation is a trendsetting milestone for the development of European integrated military structures.”

Hans-Peter Bartels, the chairman of the German parliament’s defense committee, left no doubt as to the final destination of all these additions. “The hour has come, finally, for concrete steps towards a European army,” Bartels told Die Welt.

The signs are there for all to see: This will be an EU army under strong German control. Continue reading

Germany Is Building a European Army Before Your Eyes

The Dutch army is made up of three brigades, plus support staff and Special Forces. On June 12, one of those brigades, the 11th Airmobile, officially joined the German army.

This was the first time ever that European country has handed part of its army over to another country. “Never before has a state renounced this elementary and integral part of its sovereignty,” wrote Die Welt’s political editor Thorsten Jungholt.

Now, Germany is making it clear that this was not an isolated event. Instead, it is a pattern Germany intends to follow as it absorbs more units from foreign militaries. “Germany is driving the European Army Project” was the title of Jungholt’s Die Welt article. Continue reading