China eyes ‘The Art of War’ as Trump signals battle on trade

There’s a Chinese saying that stems from the philosophy in Sun Tzu’s ancient text “The Art of War”: You can kill 1,000 enemies, but you would also lose 800 soldiers.

Centuries later, the proverb is suddenly apt again, being mentioned frequently in discussions around Beijing. Now, it highlights the potential damage U.S. President-elect Donald Trump could inflict if he makes good on his threat to start a trade war with China, the world’s second-biggest economy.

Having backed off some other campaign pledges, it’s unclear if Trump will end up slapping punitive tariffs on China — and Beijing has signaled some optimism he will be more pragmatic in office. Still, the message from China is that any move to tax Chinese imports would bring retaliation: The U.S. economy would take a hit and America would damage its long-standing ties with Asia. Continue reading

The ‘Inevitable War’ Between the U.S. and China

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Chinese soldiers of the People’s Liberation Army Navy stand guard in the Spratly Islands, known in China as the Nansha Islands, on February 10. The Spratlys are the most contested archipelago in the South China Sea. Stringer/Reuters

 

Roughly 15 years ago, a Chinese fighter jet pilot was killed when he collided with an American spy plane over the South China Sea. The episode marked the start of tensions between Beijing and Washington over China’s claim to the strategic waterway. So in May, when two Chinese warplanes nearly crashed into an American spy plane over the same area, many in China felt a familiar sense of nationalist outrage. “Most Chinese people hope China’s fighter jets will shoot down the next spy plane,” wrote the Global Times, China’s official nationalist mouthpiece.

Though little talked about in the West, many Chinese officials have long felt that war between Washington and Beijing is inevitable. A rising power, the thinking goes, will always challenge a dominant one. Of course, some analysts dismiss this idea; the costs of such a conflict would be too high, and the U.S., which is far stronger militarily, would almost certainly win. Yet history is riddled with wars that appeared to make no sense. Continue reading

China to increase military spending ‘by about 10 per cent this year’: NPC spokeswoman

Fu Ying, the National People’s Congress spokeswoman, told this week’s annual plenum that the rise was in line with suggestions by the central authority.

The mainland increased its military budget by 12.2 per cent last year. Continue reading

China ups military spending by 12 percent. Are the gloves coming off?

1) The exchange rate between the yuan and US Dollar is sizeable – 6.12 yuan per US Dollar at this very moment.

2) The PLA doesn’t have the same overhead costs, as servicemen are paid peanuts compared to their American counterparts.

3) Screws, bolts and other similar parts do not cost $25 each after everyone gets their pockets lined.

The moral of this story: Don’t ever let anyone use the “But the Chinese costs are only 0.00001% of what America spends!” argument. They’re absolutely clueless, haven’t done their homework, and are the exact reason why one day the United States will get hit with One Clenched Fist.

The Chinese threat (as well as the Russian) is real and becoming more dangerous each day. Combine this with the US un-intelligence community not even knowing what their enemies are up to and, Houston, we have a problem.

The sword is coming.

China made headlines today with its annual military budget, up 12.2 percent to $132 billion dollars this year. That’s about one quarter of the $495 billion military budget that President Obama presented to Congress yesterday.

Predictably, official commentary here stresses that China is a peace-loving nation with no aggressive intentions. But Beijing has also signaled its ambitions to be the power that holds the ring in the western Pacific, and those ambitions have been spelled out, arguably clearer than ever before, in a direct challenge to US military preeminence.

China needs a powerful military, explained Fu Ying, spokeswoman for the National People’s Congress, on Tuesday because “if some country provokes or undermines consensus or even damages peace and order in the region, then China must respond effectively.”  Continue reading

China says military will respond to provocations

Legislative spokeswoman Fu Ying said China supports resolving disputes through negotiations and its 2.3 million-member People’s Liberation Army — the world’s largest — is for defensive purposes only.

However, Fu warned other nations not to test China’s resolve. Continue reading

China Says Ready for ‘Escalation’ in Maritime Dispute With Philippines

China says it is ready to respond to “any escalation” by the Philippines, as a tense, month-long standoff continues over a disputed group of islands in the South China Sea.

The state-run Xinhua news agency on Tuesday quoted Vice Foreign Minister Fu Ying as saying Beijing is not optimistic about the dispute over the Scarborough Shoal, located about 230 kilometers off the northwestern Philippines.

On Monday, Fu summoned a top Philippine diplomat in Beijing to make a “serious representation” over the situation. Fu told Charge D’affaires Alex Chua that Manila was escalating tensions and making it more difficult to reach a negotiated settlement.

China says the islands, known as Huangyan in China, are a key part of Chinese territory and that any Philippine claim to them is baseless. The Philippines says the shoal is well within its internationally recognized exclusive economic zone.

The Philippines, China, Vietnam, Taiwan, Malaysia and Brunei all have competing claims in the South China Sea.  China claims nearly the entire energy-rich region.

Full article: China Says Ready for ‘Escalation’ in Maritime Dispute With Philippines (Voice of America)