The Only Remaining Boom Sector

Germany will now control Greek infrastructure for 40 years, via a majority state-owned company. If anyone questions a resurgent Germany and its conquest of Europe again, they need to reassess and look at the hard evidence. It isn’t called the Fourth Reich here loosely.

BERLIN/ATHENS (Own report) – The German Fraport Company is preparing, under very strong protests from Greek trade unionists, to take over the operation and management of 14 of Greece’s airports. The concessions, which Fraport was awarded back in late 2015, will entrust the German company with the operational and management functioning of Greece’s most profitable regional airports – for a duration of 40 years. Annual profits are estimated to begin at 90 million Euros. The Greek state with retain 23 regional airports, including several that are in acute deficit, but must still be expensively maintained, as links between remote islands and the Greek mainland. One of the most powerful Greek oligarchs has a share not only in Fraport’s profits from the current takeover, but has for years been involved in operating the Pulkovo Airport in St. Petersburg. Fraport is one of the few German companies still investing in Greece. Many others are withdrawing from the country. The country’s crisis had led to a massive reduction in consumption, which does not permit attractive profits. The most important exception to this rule is the tourism sector, from which the Fraport airports can make profits in processing vacation flights. Continue reading

Greece to sell water, energy firms under EU deal

And more infrastructure gets plundered in the raid of Greek national sovereignty. Soon we’ll find out who gets what in this case — and it could be Germany once again, which just days ago, took over the Greek airport infrastructure. The Fourth Reich has pulled off the greatest heist of all time.

 

Greek privatisations under the EU bailout are set to include water companies, leading energy firms, and swathes of infrastructure.

The list, compiled by the Hellenic Republic Asset Development Fund, and agreed with creditors on 30 July, was published on Wednesday (19 August) by German Green MEP Sven Giegold.

He said the Greek public “hardly knows” what will be sold off and has “the right” to more “transparency”.

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Greek Liquidation Sale Begins: German Company Wins Privatization Bid For 14 Greek Regional Airports

Can you guess who gets the prize? That’s right, Germany’s Fourth Reich.

 

Greek Liquidation Sale Begins: German Company Wins Privatization Bid For 14 Greek Regional Airports

Who would have thought.

A German company, airport operator FRAPORT won the bid to operate and maintain 14 regional airports, considered to be top of the top in Greece. With an offer of 1.23 billion euro, the consortium of Fraport-Slentel (a unit of Greek energy group Copelouzos) won the bid to lease the regional airports for 40+10 years. Among the 14 regional airports are those on most popular tourist Greek islands like Mykonos, Rhodes, Kos, Santorini and Corfu. It is the first privatization deal under SYRIZA-ANEL coalition government and the biggest privatization deal in Greece since beginning of the crisis and the bailout programs in 2010.

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Greece to finalise airports deal ‘immediately’ – source

…and Greek further capitulates to Germany’s Fourth Reich. If they ever get tired of being a German vassal state and decide to go with the economic ‘nuclear option’, don’t be shocked to find Russian military bases and Chinese owned shipping ports within Greek territory.

 

(Reuters) – Greece will finalise “immediately” a 1.2-billion-euro (£883.2 million) deal with Fraport (FRAG.DE) to run regional airports and reopen bidding for a majority stake in Piraeus port (Rolph.AT), a senior privatisations official said on Tuesday.

The asset sales had been in doubt after Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’ leftist-led government took power in January but may be the latest concessions offered by his government to try to secure more bailout cash from international creditors. Continue reading