No More Taboos For the German Army

Germany removes the last restraints on its use of the armed forces, while its defense minister declares that there will be “no taboos”.

The year 1993 pivotal for the German military. Germany established its armed forces in 1956, but memories of two world wars meant that they were restricted to defensive operations within nato territory.

In 1991, this slowly began to change. Thirty German soldiers deployed in Baghdad, Iraq, to help with airlift operations. The same year, 150 medics were sent with a United Nations mission to Cambodia.

The first substantial foreign mission came in 1993, with over 2,000 military personnel deploying to Somalia as UN peacekeepers. The same year, German soldiers joined in aerial operations over Yugoslavia.

The world had no problems with these operations. In fact, the UN and United States desperately wanted the German army to do more, but to many Germans, this was too much. Germany’s main left-wing party, the Social Democratic Party (spd), and the free market Free Democratic Party (fdp) complained to the German Constitutional Court that these deployments violated Germany’s Basic Law—its constitution. Continue reading

The German Path to an EU Army (II)

As mentioned earlier, Great Britain would never support such an idea or concept, which is why you will see them pushed out of the EU by Germany. The immigration ‘issue’ is just a cover.

It’s not about immigration and never has been. It’s about who controls the European continent and Germany cannot with Britain in the way. You’re looking at a post-USA world where a future United States of Europe, the world’s next superpower, is led by the Fourth Reich at the helm.

The suicidal decline of the United States is the primary factor behind the power vacuum being filled.

 

BERLIN (Own report) – Prominent German think tanks and politicians are calling for the establishment of an EU army. To this effect, “integration options” in military policy are viewed as appropriate, for example, at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP). In a paper published by the German Ministry of Defense, an SWP researcher writes that the current financial crisis has clearly shown some European countries that “sovereignty built on autonomy is illusory.” However, to prevent possible reservations of some EU member countries, the author recommends avoiding the label “European army.” Efforts tending in the same direction but “under a different name” would have “more chances of success.” The Vice President of the European Parliament, Alexander Graf Lambsdorff (FDP) of Germany, has expressed a similar view. “Only a European approach” to military matters can assure that the “economic giant” Germany will not remain a “political dwarf” when enforcing “western values and interests,” Lambsdorff declared in a newspaper article.

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New German Coalition to Pursue European Army

Germany lays out its ambitions for the next four years, including a plan to ‘strive for an ever closer associate of European forces, which can evolve into a parliamentary European army.’

Germany wants to create a new European army, according to one of the latest documents to come out of its coalition agreement. The coalition paper on foreign affairs and defense, published November 19 and approved by the coalition panel led by German Chancellor Angela Merkel, calls for Germany to face “up to its international responsibilities” and “stand ready if contributions to the resolution of crises and conflicts are expected.”

The paper explains that in order to “be prepared for the mission of the future,” the EU must work together. Wherever “useful and possible” there should be “a sharing of national military capabilities in the EU … as well as … a greater division of labor,” the report said—adding that the same thing applies to NATO.

But its most striking statement was: “We strive for an ever closer association of European forces, which can evolve into a parliament-controlled European army.” Continue reading

‘Credible Deterrence’: Germany Plans to Deploy Armed Drones

First comes the merging of states via political and social solidarity. Then, next is the “European Army” member nations have been calling for. Sometime later, and through an upcoming “United States of Europe” lead and dominated by Germany, meet your new king of the northern hemisphere and next world superpower. Some who say China would be the next might be in for a huge surprise.

A document obtained by SPIEGEL ONLINE indicates the German government is preparing to procure armed drones for foreign combat. Opposition politicians are outraged by the development and note that the use of weapons-equipped unmanned aircraft is legally dubious and possibly unethical.

Bowing to pressure from the German armed forces, the Bundeswehr, the federal government in Berlin is preparing to deploy armed, unmanned drones in foreign conflicts. In an answer to an official query made by the far-left Left Party, which has been obtained by SPIEGEL ONLINE, the German government wrote that its experience in foreign combat operations has made it clear that reconnaissance vehicles must be armed “in order to provide protection against sudden and serious changes in the situation.” Continue reading

German Master Plans

While everyone’s focus nowadays is concentrated on mainly American “imperialism”, another nation is quitely and effectively making great strides at capturing the northern hemisphere.

PYONGYANG/BERLIN (Own report) – German foreign policy makers are reacting with great anticipation to the most recent announcement of an economic “opening” of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. According to head of state, Kim Jong Un’s declaration, the country is facing a “radical change of course,” which would not even exclude a “reunification” with the Republic of Korea. According to reports, German economic scholars and jurists are in Pyongyang helping to elaborate economic policies, which could also open up lucrative business opportunities for western companies. It has been reported that North Korea disposes of large deposits of natural resources and an extremely cheap work force. For several years, German experts, under contract of the FDP-affiliated Friedrich Naumann Foundation, have been working in Pyongyang to promote the “transformation from a planned to a market economy.” In addition, because of its experience in taking over the German Democratic Republic, South Korea considers the Federal Republic of Germany an important partner for advice and cooperation on the issue of “reunification.” The development taking place on the Korean peninsular is very important for the People’s Republic of China, whose national security is seriously affected. Continue reading