Leaked Chinese Memo Warns Of “Thucydides Trap” With US, “War Is Unavoidable”

https://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/inline-images/chintro].JPG

 

A series of leaked internal documents reveal that China’s military reforms are aimed at allowing Beijing to “manage a crisis, contain a conflict, win a war” and overtake the United States in military strength, according to the Express.

The leaked documents were published by the Central Military Commission in February for the purpose of spreading President Xi Jinping’s “thought on strengthening the armed forces”.

If the reforms go ahead, they will lead to heightened tensions with China’s neighbouring countries, including Japan, in the East and South China Seas and the US. –Express Continue reading

Chinese Regime Leader Xi Jinping Seizes Control Over Key Law Enforcement Agency

 

Chinese Communist Party leader Xi Jinping attends welcoming ceremony for Malaysia's leaders outside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, on September 4, 2014. Xi has enhanced his control over the Political and Law Commission with direct management, according to state news media on Oct. 23, 2014. (Lintao Zhang/Getty Images)

 

On the last day of the biggest meeting of year of the leaders of the Chinese Communist Party state-run media announced Party head Xi Jinping was taking direct control over a key law enforcement agency.

On Thursday, Beijing News published an article saying Xi was directly in charge of the Political and Legal Affairs Commission (PLAC) and would focus concern on the reform of the legal system in China. The decision was announced at the 4th Plenary of the Central Committee of the 18th National Party Congress. Continue reading

5 Things to Look for at the Chinese Regime’s Big Political Conclave

The most important meeting this year on the calendar of the Chinese Communist Party opened Oct 20 in Beijing and runs through Oct. 23. At the Fourth Plenary Session of Central Committee of the 18th National Party Congress there are 5 issues that can be expected to be covered.

How Far Will Judicial Reform Go?

“With a law that cannot be put into practice, the law would simply be useless words. And the rule of law would be an empty talk,” said head of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) Xi Jinping during the central political conference in January this year. “Lax law enforcement and unjust judicial system are the results of only a handful of police officers have a sense of professional moral values.”

“Some of the lawyers, judges and prosecutors are working together. And together they become some sort of judicial brokers,” Xi said.

Continue reading

Behind China’s Anti-Japan Protests, the Hand of Officials

Ruling class parties using staged demonstrations with real effect are nothing new when living under a communist regime.

There were protests in over 57 cities in China, according to World Journal, a Chinese newspaper published outside of China.

A number of other Weibo users noted that many of the protesters were not local, did not have rail passes, and did not speak the local language. One Guangzhou resident suspected that they were sent from out of town to make trouble.

In many cities, police in uniform or other security forces kept the protesters in some semblance of order—in contrast to the usual role played by Chinese authorities, who crush any protest perceived as antigovernment.

The Hidden Hand

One Weibo user, attuned to the signs of Chinese political struggle, wrote, “Firstly, who can control armed police, plainclothes police, and public security all over the country? Secondly, who can control televisions all over the country to keep silent? Thirdly, who can control Sina Weibo and delete posts as soon as they appear? This someone must be the one that is behind these violent incidents all over the country.”

The most prominent theory of who the “someone” is, is hard-liners in the security and propaganda apparatus who are aligned with former regime leader Jiang Zemin; many owe their political legacy to the implementation of Jiang’s persecution of the Falun Gong spiritual practice.

Though some analysts and insiders indicated that arrangements for the upcoming leadership changeover this fall were settled, the recent absence of Xi Jinping, the presumptive next leader of the regime, and the dispute with Japan may have given this group an opening to exploit and push for greater power, according to analysts.

Full article: Behind China’s Anti-Japan Protests, the Hand of Officials (The Epoch Times)

Commentary 7: On the Chinese Communist Party’s History of Killing

Most posts here will not be this long, however this article is a must read to gain further insight and understanding on how China is ran, and by who. Since China’s Communist infection began when Chairman Mao took power in 1945, over 100 million of its own citizens have been slaughtered all in the name of a failed political ideology. It still continues today and because it isn’t portrayed on the “mainstream media” it doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen. What’s more, one must consider what could happen should Chinese militaristic expansion continue beyond its borders as democratic world powers such as the United States continue to falter and become less significant on the world stage. The US is in direct danger. It all comes from the ideology. Please click the referenced link to the article to read the next five pages.

The 55-year history of the CCP is written with blood and lies. The stories behind this bloody history are both extremely tragic and rarely known. Under the rule of the CCP, 60 to 80 million innocent Chinese people have been killed, leaving their broken families behind. Many people wonder why the CCP kills.

While the CCP recently suppressed protesting crowds in Hanyuan with gunshots [in November 2004] and continues its brutal persecution of Falun Gong practitioners, many people wonder whether they will ever see the day when the CCP will learn to speak with words rather than guns.

Mao Zedong summarized the purpose of the Cultural Revolution, “After the chaos the world reaches peace, but in seven or eight years, the chaos needs to happen again.”[1] In other words, there should be a political revolution every seven or eight years, and a crowd of people needs to be killed every seven or eight years.

A supporting ideology and practical requirements lie behind the CCP’s slaughters.

Ideologically, the CCP believes in the “dictatorship of the proletariat” and “continuous revolution under the dictatorship of the proletariat.” Therefore, after the CCP took over China, it killed the landowners to resolve problems with production relationships in rural areas. It killed the capitalists to reach the goal of commercial and industrial reform and solve the production relationships in the cities. After these two classes were eliminated, the problems related to the economic base were basically solved.

Similarly, solving the problems related to the superstructure also called for slaughter. The suppressions of the Hu Feng Anti-Party Group and the Anti-Rightist Movement eliminated the intellectuals. Killing the Christians, Taoists, Buddhists, and popular folk groups solved the problem of religions.

Mass murders during the Cultural Revolution established, culturally and politically, the CCP’s absolute leadership. The Tiananmen Square massacre was used to prevent political crisis and squelch democratic demands. The persecution of Falun Gong is meant to resolve the issues of belief and traditional healing.

These actions were all necessary for the CCP to strengthen its power and maintain its rule in the face of continual financial crisis (prices for consumer goods skyrocketed after the CCP took power, and China’s economy almost collapsed after the Cultural Revolution), political crisis (some people not following the Party’s orders or some others wanting to share political rights with the Party), and crisis of belief (the disintegration of the former Soviet Union, political changes in Eastern Europe, and the Falun Gong issue).

Except for the Falun Gong issue, almost all the foregoing political movements were utilized to revive the evil specter of the CCP and incite its desire for revolution. The CCP also used these political movements to test CCP members, eliminating those who did not meet the Party’s requirements.

Killing is also necessary for practical reasons. The Communist Party began as a group of thugs and scoundrels who killed to obtain power. Once this precedent was set, there was no going back. Constant terror was needed to intimidate people and force them to accept, out of fear, the absolute rule of the CCP.

On the surface, it may appear that the CCP was “forced to kill” and that various incidents just happened to irritate the CCP evil specter and accidentally trigger the CCP’s killing mechanism. In truth, these incidents serve to disguise the Party’s need to kill, and periodical killing is required by the CCP.

Without these painful lessons, people might begin to think the CCP was improving and start to demand democracy, just as those idealistic students in the 1989 democratic movement did. Recurring slaughter every seven or eight years serves to refresh people’s memory of terror and can warn the younger generation: Whoever works against the CCP, wants to challenge the CCP’s absolute leadership, or attempts to tell the truth regarding China’s history, will get a taste of the “iron fist of the dictatorship of the proletariat.”

Killing has become one of the most essential ways for the CCP to maintain power. With the escalation of its bloody debts, laying down its butcher knife would encourage people to take vengeance for the CCP’s criminal acts.

Therefore, the CCP not only needed to conduct copious and thorough killing, but the slaughter also had to be done in a most brutal fashion to intimidate the populace effectively, especially early on, when the CCP was establishing its rule.

Since the purpose of the killing was to instill the greatest terror, the CCP selected targets for destruction arbitrarily and irrationally. In every political movement, the CCP used the strategy of genocide. Take the Suppression of the Counter-Revolutionary Movement as an example.

The CCP did not really suppress the reactionary behaviors, but the people whom they called the counter-revolutionaries. If one had been enlisted and served a few days in the KMT Army but did absolutely nothing political after the CCP gained power, this person would still be killed because of his “reactionary history.” In the process of land reform, in order to remove the “root of the problem,” the CCP often killed a landowner’s entire family.

Since 1949, the CCP has persecuted more than half the people in China. An estimated 60 million to 80 million people died from unnatural causes. This number exceeds the total number of deaths in both World Wars combined.

Without these painful lessons, people might begin to think the CCP was improving and start to demand democracy, just as those idealistic students in the 1989 democratic movement did. Recurring slaughter every seven or eight years serves to refresh people’s memory of terror and can warn the younger generation: Whoever works against the CCP, wants to challenge the CCP’s absolute leadership, or attempts to tell the truth regarding China’s history, will get a taste of the “iron fist of the dictatorship of the proletariat.”

Killing has become one of the most essential ways for the CCP to maintain power. With the escalation of its bloody debts, laying down its butcher knife would encourage people to take vengeance for the CCP’s criminal acts.

Therefore, the CCP not only needed to conduct copious and thorough killing, but the slaughter also had to be done in a most brutal fashion to intimidate the populace effectively, especially early on, when the CCP was establishing its rule.

Since the purpose of the killing was to instill the greatest terror, the CCP selected targets for destruction arbitrarily and irrationally. In every political movement, the CCP used the strategy of genocide. Take the Suppression of the Counter-Revolutionary Movement as an example.

The CCP did not really suppress the reactionary behaviors, but the people whom they called the counter-revolutionaries. If one had been enlisted and served a few days in the KMT Army but did absolutely nothing political after the CCP gained power, this person would still be killed because of his “reactionary history.” In the process of land reform, in order to remove the “root of the problem,” the CCP often killed a landowner’s entire family.

Since 1949, the CCP has persecuted more than half the people in China. An estimated 60 million to 80 million people died from unnatural causes. This number exceeds the total number of deaths in both World Wars combined.

As with other communist countries, the wanton killing done by the CCP also includes brutal slayings of its own members in order to remove dissidents who value a sense of humanity over the Party nature. The CCP’s rule of terror falls equally on the populace and its members in an attempt to maintain an “invincible fortress.”

In a normal society, people show care and love for one another, hold life in awe and veneration, and give thanks to God. In the East, people say, “Do not impose on others what you would not want done to yourself.”[2] In the West, people say, “Love thy neighbor as thyself.”[3]

Conversely, the CCP holds that “The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles.”[4] In order to keep alive the “struggles” within society, hatred must be generated. Not only does the CCP take lives, it encourages people to kill each other.

It strives to desensitize people toward others’ suffering by surrounding them with constant killing. It wants them to become numb from frequent exposure to inhumane brutality and develop the mentality that the best you can hope for is to avoid being persecuted. All these lessons taught by brutal suppression enable the CCP to maintain its rule.

In addition to the destruction of countless lives, the CCP also destroyed the soul of the Chinese people. A great many people have become conditioned to react to the CCP’s threats by entirely surrendering their reason and their principles. In a sense, these people’s souls have died—something more frightening than physical death.

I. Horrendous Massacre

Before the CCP was in power, Mao Zedong wrote, “We definitely do not apply a policy of benevolence to the counter-revolutionaries and towards the reactionary activities of the reactionary classes.”[5] In other words, even before the CCP took over Beijing, it had already made up its mind to act tyrannically under the euphemism of the People’s Democratic Dictatorship. The following are a few examples.

Suppression of the Counter-Revolutionaries and Land Reform

In March 1950, the CCP announced “Orders to Strictly Suppress Reactionary Elements,” which is historically known as the movement of Suppression of the Counter-Revolutionaries.

Unlike all the emperors who granted amnesty to the entire country after they were crowned, the CCP started killing the minute it gained power. Mao Zedong said in a document, “There are still many places where people are intimidated and dare not kill the counter-revolutionaries openly on a large scale.”[6]

In February 1951, the central CCP said that except for Zhejiang Province and southern Anhui Province, “other areas which are not killing enough, especially in the large and mid-sized cities, should continue to arrest and kill a large number and should not stop too soon.”

Mao even recommended, “In rural areas, to kill the counter-revolutionaries, there should be over one thousandth of the total population killed. … In the cities, it should be less than one thousandth.”[7] The population of China at that time was approximately 600 million, and this “royal order” from Mao would have caused at least 600,000 deaths.

Nobody knows where this ratio of one-thousandth came from. Perhaps, on a whim, Mao decided these 600,000 lives should be enough to lay the foundation for creating fear among the people, and thus ordered it to happen.

Whether those killed deserved to die was not the CCP’s concern. “The People’s Republic of China Regulations for Punishing the Counter-Revolutionaries” announced in 1951 that those who “spread rumors” can be “immediately executed.”

While the Suppression of Counter-Revolutionaries was being hotly implemented, land reform was also taking place on a large scale. In fact, the CCP had already started land reform within its occupied areas in the late 1920s.

On the surface, land reform appeared to advocate an ideal similar to that of the Heavenly Kingdom of Taiping[8]: All would have land to farm. It was really just an excuse to kill. Tao Zhu, who ranked 4th in the CCP afterwards, had a slogan for land reform: “Every village bleeds, every household fights,” indicating that in every village the landowners must die.

Land reform could have been achieved without killing. It could have been done in the same way as the Taiwanese government implemented its land reform by purchasing the property from the landowners. HoweverS as the CCP originated from a group of thugs and lumpen proletariat, it only knew how to rob. Fearing it might suffer revenge after robbing, the CCP naturally needed to kill the victims, thus stamping out the source of potential trouble.

The most common way to kill during the land reform was known as the Struggle Meeting. The CCP fabricated crimes and charged the landowners or rich farmers. The public was asked how they should be punished. Some CCP members or activists were already planted in the crowd to shout, “We should kill them!” and the landowners and rich peasants were then executed on the spot.

At that time, whoever owned land in the villages was classified as a “bully.” Those who often took advantage of the peasants were called “mean bullies;” those who often helped with repairing public facilities and donated money to schools and for natural disaster relief were called “kind bullies;” and those who did nothing were called “still or silent bullies.” A classification like this was meaningless because all the “bullies” ended up being executed right away regardless of what “bully” category they belonged to.

By the end of 1952, the CCP-published number of executed “reactionary elements” was about 2.4 million. Actually, the total death toll of landowners and former KMT government officials below the county level was at least 5 million.

The Suppression of the Counter-Revolutionaries and land reform had three direct results. First, former local officials who had been selected through clan-based autonomy were eliminated. The CCP killed all the management personnel in the previous system and realized complete control of rural areas by installing a Party branch in each village.

Second, a huge amount of wealth was obtained by stealing and robbing. Third, civilians were terrorized by the brutal suppression against the landowners and rich farmers.

Full article: Commentary 7: On the Chinese Communist Party’s History of Killing (The Epoch Times)

Committee Ruling Chinese Communist Party May Reduce to Seven – Factional power shift will benefit Hu Jintao

The report also said that more Party officials have requested that the number of PSC members be cut from nine to seven so that decisions and polices can be “implemented faster and better.”

Actually, prior to the 16th Party Congress, the PSC had been a seven-member committee. It was former Party leader Jiang Zemin who added two extra members.

According to Chinese dissident Song Yuxuan, who lives outside China, Jiang pushed the appointments of Li Changchun and Luo Gan, as those two men would continue Jiang’s persecution of Falun Gong and support Jiang, Song told The Epoch Times.

Li Changchun, as the head of the Central Propaganda Department, has played an important role in controlling media and guiding public opinion in China. “If not for Li Changchun’s roles [as both Propaganda Minister and PSC member], Hu would have been able to directly arrange the Central Propaganda Department to influence public opinion himself,” Song said.

Song said if the PSC is to be restored to a seven-member organization, except for Xi Jinping, the most discussed members are all part of the Youth League faction headed by Hu Jintao, and Hu will have the opportunity to completely remove Jiang’s faction from the top CCP ruling committee.

Liu Yinquan, a former professor in history at Shandong University and now secretary of the China Social Democratic Party, which is based outside China, agrees.

“In the past 10 years, Hu had to do things as Jiang wishes before he decided things,” Lin told the New York-based New Tang Dynasty TV. “There were even rumors about coup attempts against Hu. These were very cruel facts. If the PSC has only seven members, it will be beneficial for Hu and Wen”

Liu thinks that those remaining on the PSC loyal to Jiang will be removed if the reduction is made.

Recently many members of Jiang’s faction, who serve as regional officials as well as in the military, have pledged their loyalty to Hu.

Jiang Zemin hasn’t been heard from in several months and is said to be in a vegetative state.

Full article: Committee Ruling Chinese Communist Party May Reduce to Seven – Factional power shift will benefit Hu Jintao (Epoch Times)

Major Players in Beijing Power Struggle

Amidst the alleged coup that took place in China, here is a quick list of who’s who in today’s Chinese movers and shakers (click link for pictures):

Hu Jintao
Current paramount leader of Chinese Communist Party.
Promoted for persecution in Tibet.
To be replaced by Xi Jinping.
Allied with Premier Wen Jiabao.

Wen Jiabao
Premier
Argued against Bo Xilai’s promotion to vice premier during 17th Congress.
Wants to reform CCP.

Xi Jinping
Next Chairman, current VP, vice chair Central Military Commission
Unaligned, tolerated by both factions but was possible target for overthrow by Bo Xilai and Zhou Yongkang.

Wang Lijun
Former Head of Chongqing Municipal Public Security Bureau
Attempted to defect while at the U.S. Consulate Feb. 6.
Rumored to have betrayed Bo to Hu-Wen faction, possibly leading to Bo’s arrest.

Jiang Zemin
Former leader of communist party
Is said to be the real No. 2 of the Standing Committee. Helped further Bo Xilai’s political career.

Zhou Yongkang
Secretary of Political and Legislative Affairs Committee.
Rumored to have been recently purged. Hard-liner and ally of Jiang; rose through persecuting Falun Gong.

Bo Xilai
Former Chongqing party secretary
Ally of Zhou and Jiang, once a possibility for Standing Committee, recently purged and arrested. Rose through persecuting Falun Gong.

Full article: Major Players in Beijing Power Struggle (Epoch Times)