Greece Unleashes ‘Soft’ Cash Ban

The spread of global cash bans continues with Greece unveiling their so-called ‘soft’ approach by which taxpayers will only be granted tax-allowances or deductions when payments are made via credit or debit cards. As KeepTalkingGreeece reports, the new guidelines refer to employees, pensioners, farmers, and also the unemployed. Continue reading

Attention President Obama: One Third Of U.S. Households Can No Longer Afford Food, Rent And Transportation

While the Fed has long been focusing on the revenue part of the household income statement (which unfortunately has not been rising nearly fast enough to stimulate benign inflation in the form of nominal wages rising at the Fed’s preferred clip of 3.5% or higher), one largely ignored aspect of said balance sheet has been the expense side: after all, for any money to be left over and saved, income has to surpass expenses. However, according to a striking new Pew study while household spending has returned to pre-recession levels (the average household spent $36,800 in 2014) incomes have not.

Specifically, while the median income had fallen by 13% from 2004 levels over the next decade, expenditures had increased by nearly 14%. But nobody was more impacted than the one-third of households which the study defines as “low-income.” Pew finds that while all households had less slack in their budgets in 2014 than in 2004, lower-income households went into the red by over $2,300. Continue reading

Debt Limit Coming a Month Earlier Than Expected (Updated)

Updated 5:56 p.m. | The Treasury Department said Thursday it would reach the debt limit a bit earlier than was expected by many on Capitol Hill.

Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew told Congress in a new letter that thanks in part to lower-than-expected quarterly tax receipts, the extraordinary measures to forestall breaching the debt limit, combined with the new revenues, will run their course just a week after the resignation of Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, takes effect. Continue reading

China’s economy might be bigger than previously thought

If you’re looking to turn your world upside down today, try this on for size. What if China’s economy is actually bigger than everyone thinks?

Did your head just go “Boom?” Well, then maybe this will blow your mind: The Wall Street Journal is putting forth that idea. Yes, one of Western media’s biggest proponents of China’s heading for a hard landing, thinks that China’s government isn’t over reporting economic statistics, but instead, underselling them. Continue reading

Is Germany Already Signaling The Complete (Economic) Collapse Of The European Union?

Should the proverbial you-know-what hit the fan, expect a breakup and future realignment with a ‘coalition of the willing’. We could also be looking at a two-tier monetary system. The uniting factor will likely be economically, plus security and defense driven (by fears of Russia), with the former being necessary for the latter. The question isn’t if a crash and subsequent breakup will follow, because it will, but what will lie in the wake of the aftermath.

 

In an attempt to try to divert a looming economic stagnation in the European Union, some leading German and French economists have launched some plans to try to revive (read: ‘resuscitate’) the economy of the Eurozone by tackling two issues which might have deteriorated the economic situation in the currency bloc.

Even though it’s unlikely that Germany will revert its stance and more than double its investment in infrastructure-related projects, it does look like the country would be willing to keep the door open for private parties to incur the expenditures. Those will obviously have to be incentivized by for instance a tax holiday or some other monetary advantages. But the budget for infrastructure isn’t Germany’s only problem. Because of its rapidly ageing population, there will be a strong need for new entrants on the labor market and those will very likely have to be sourced through immigration. One of the proposed plans is to automatically give foreigners who graduate from a German university a work permit. This should entice more people to effectively stay in Germany and to support the pyramid of the labor market. Continue reading