Defiant Tsipras Warns European Leaders They Are “Making A Grave Mistake”

The long-warned Fourth Reich is coming and Greece, while not completely innocent itself, is likely to fall victim of a new rising empire that wishes to turn it into a vassal state. Also, mentioned many times is that the most likely solution for Europe is not a break-up, but rather a dual economy. The dual economy will have a core comprising of the wealthy nations running the show while the periphery will contain the downtrodden who will import all the factory jobs to keep them socially satisfied so long as they have employment and widgets to crank out. The EU and Eurozone may not be around for long, but it will be rebuilt, restructured and resemble a United States of Europe. It’s all a controlled meltdown designed to fail in order to achieve the goal of becoming a world superpower. Create the crisis and provide the solution — by force if necessary.

 

We’ve said repeatedly that negotiations between Greece and the troika are just as much about politics as they are about economics although, in the final analysis the two are inextricably related especially as it relates to the anti-austerity contagion in the EU. In “Democracy Under Fire: Troika Looks To Force Greek Political ‘Reshuffle’” we said the following about the “institutions’” bargaining stance:

It is becoming increasingly clear that the Syriza show will ultimately have to be canceled in Greece (or at least recast) if the country intends to find a long-term solution that allows for stable relations with European creditors, but as we’ve noted before, it may be time for Greeks to ask themselves if binding their fate to Europe is in their best interests given that some EU creditors seem to be perfectly fine with inflicting untold economic pain upon everyday Greeks if it means usurping the ‘radical leftists.’ 

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Greek debt crisis: Cash-strapped country runs out of money to pay public sector workers

GREECE’s public sector employees and suppliers have not been paid amid further signs the cash-strapped country’s bankruptcy is imminent.

As the country’s need for a bailout loan reaches crisis point, workers and business reliant on government funding have been left in a state of panic and confusion.

“We are now running one month behind on our salaries. Until only recently we were two months behind, and no-one would tell us if and when we would get our next pay cheque,” one employee at an institution funded by the government told the BBC. Continue reading