Germany Is Taking Over the Dutch Army

Once the military aspect as well as political component are there, the United States of Europe will be formed — as talked about for years here now.

The Fourth Reich has landed.

You have not anchored Germany to Europe,… You have anchored Europe to a newly dominant, unified Germany. In the end, my friends, you’ll find it will not work.

– Margaret Thatcher

 

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Army Deputy Chief of Staff Reinhard Kammerer (center), new commander of the DSK Eberhard Zorn (right), and former commander of DSO Joerg Vollmer mark the integration of Dutch forces in Stadtallendorf, Germany. ( Sascha Schuermann/Getty Images)

 

 

Dutch tanks are now under German command—preparing the way for a German-led multinational tank division and a European army.

Huge portions of the Dutch military are being merged with the German Army, in a process that many want to see rolled out across the whole Continent. Two of the Netherland’s three combat brigades have officially begun the process of joining the Bundeswehr.

The 11th Airmobile Brigade came under German command in 2014. Then on March 17, the 43rd Mechanized Brigade officially became part of the German 1st Armored Division. The Dutch Army now has only the 13th Mechanized Brigade, plus special forces, support and headquarters staff under its own command.

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Under German Command

BERLIN/THE HAGUE/WARSAW (Own report) – The German Bundeswehr has announced the formation of a permanent military unit of foreigners under German command. Beginning in January 2014, approx. 2,100 soldiers from the Netherlands will be integrated into the “Rapid Reaction Force Division” as a result of a declaration of intent signed in Berlin last week by the defense ministers of both countries. Three dozen projects for closer cooperation between the two armed forces are planned. A second, similar declaration of intent, stipulating closer naval cooperation was also signed between the defense ministers of Germany and Poland. This cooperation includes combat missions. Specialists in military policy have been calling for intensifying military cooperation to increase the Bundeswehr’s military clout. Berlin would be well advised to seek cooperation particularly with the smaller countries, because they, it is said, unlike France or Great Britain, are more pliable allies due to their lesser power potentials. Continue reading