Europe’s Push Toward a Unified Military

The official flag of Eurocorps military contingent (FREDERICK FLORIN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

 

As global threats increase, many nations support the idea of an independent and united European military. Here is why we expect it to happen, and where we expect it to lead.

The 100 years between 1815 and when World War i started in 1914 were one of Europe’s greatest periods of peace ever. But that isn’t to say it was peaceful.

Consider what happened during those years: France invaded Spain; Russia fought Turkey; various German states fought with Denmark, Austria and France; Britain and Turkey fought Russia; and Greece fought Turkey. Those are just the “highlights”—and they don’t include the numerous internal conflicts, uprisings, declarations of independence and other political unrest that occurred. Even Switzerland had a civil war.

That is what “peace” in Europe looked like before the latter half of the 20th century.

The states of Europe spent 75 percent of the 17th century at war with each other, 50 percent of the 18th century, and 25 percent of the 19th. The periods of war became shorter—but more than made up for it with devastatingly more effective weapons.

This is why many are skeptical of the creation of a “European army.” How can a continent with such a long history of war and division form a united military force? Continue reading

Is Europe Finally Ready for an Army?

Caption: (Gary Dorning)

 

Demands for it are getting louder than ever. Here is why we know it will happen.

Top leaders in Germany, France and the European Union are calling for a pan-European military. Such a military would be a truly world-shaking development. Yet many dismiss the idea because it has yet to materialize despite a long-term desire to create it.

But now, a European military seems likelier than ever. The attacks in Paris and Nice, as well as those occurring elsewhere in Europe, have left France desperate for European military help. Germany is more willing than ever to take the lead in Europe, and is remilitarizing. And Britain’s vote to leave the European Union removes Europe’s biggest obstacle to building a combined military.

Continue reading

The German Path to an EU Army (1)

Have you ever wondered what the world would like, post-Pax Americana?

As America suicidally declines, here’s your next likely superpower to fill the vacuum: A German-led EU/United States of Europe with a European Army.

The structure is set and all it needs is a unifying factor to tie the knot, such as a large-scale Russian invasion of Ukraine or a large-scale islamic terrorist attack within Europe. Europe already has a high amount of disdain for NATO and would feel more comfortable without it.

Here we also see how much influence and control Germany already wields within Polish and Dutch military circles.

This is also mainly why Germany wants Great Britain out and the British want out. It’s a matter of sovereignty whereas the immigration ‘issue’ is only an excuse for Merkel wanting to push Britain out should Britain put a halt to it.

 

BERLIN (Own report) – The German government is accelerating the creation of an EU army by means of bilateral military cooperation. The German-Polish “declaration of intent” on military cooperation of the two countries’ armed forces, signed in the middle of the week, is the most recent example. The agreement includes the exchange and joint training of officers as well as “placing combat battalions under the other’s command.” Poland’s military already has more than 130 German-made Leopard 2 battle tanks with another 120 due to be added by 2015. A sales contract to this effect was signed last year, only a few months after an agreement “reinforcing” cooperation between the Navies of the two countries was signed. At the time, German Defense Minister Thomas de Maizière (CDU) spoke of a “totally new quality” in the military cooperation between Germany and Poland. His successor, Ursula von der Leyen (CDU), has gone a step further and had her ministry declare that the intended German-Polish military cooperation is a “trendsetting milestone for the development of European integrated military structures.” Continue reading

Germany Is Building a European Army Before Your Eyes

The Dutch army is made up of three brigades, plus support staff and Special Forces. On June 12, one of those brigades, the 11th Airmobile, officially joined the German army.

This was the first time ever that European country has handed part of its army over to another country. “Never before has a state renounced this elementary and integral part of its sovereignty,” wrote Die Welt’s political editor Thorsten Jungholt.

Now, Germany is making it clear that this was not an isolated event. Instead, it is a pattern Germany intends to follow as it absorbs more units from foreign militaries. “Germany is driving the European Army Project” was the title of Jungholt’s Die Welt article. Continue reading