What Russia is up to in Syria and the ‘progressive’ U.S. suicide

As oft said here, America is suiciding itself, and in more ways than this article states.

Note: As in other rare cases when an article deserves special recognition, a majority of this article will stay posted here. Still be sure to click the source link for the full article.

 

A new round of the “Great Game”* in Syria demonstrates not so much Moscow’s growing power, as the intellectual vacuum in the West.

Western leaders, the media and experts state the obvious: the Kremlin is trying to save Assad. Of course, yes, but principal points remain outside of the focus of their attention.

It is not only about Syria. It’s about two polar ideologies, two worldviews that are incompatible with each other. Continue reading

Russia, China welcome India, Pakistan joining Shanghai Cooperation Organization

All decisions necessary for that have been taken at an SCO summit in Dushanbe in September last year, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Igor Morgulov told Chinese state news agency Xinhua

MOSCOW, January 13. /TASS/. India’s and Pakistan’s accession to the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) should help the security grouping comprising Russia, China and four ex-Soviet states in Central Asia to work more efficiently, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Igor Morgulov told Chinese state news agency Xinhua. Continue reading

Putin Signs Secret Pact to Crush NATO

Today everyone sees BRICS, but they do not see the SCO or know what purpose it serves. As the article states, it is Russia and China’s answer to the West. Moreover, it is a world-wide war axis. Over the years it has been playing it cool as to not arouse suspicion, however the military relationships are increasing and becoming more deep as larger war games and military exercises are being held. China recently hosted its largest drill ever under the SCO banner.

Militarily, this is the brass knuckle added to Russia and China’s ‘One Clenched Fist’. However, America pays no mind and continues buying New Lies for Old while suicidally disarming.

 

Back on September 11 and 12, there was a summit meeting in a city that involved an organization that most Americans have never heard of. Mainstream media coverage was all but nonexistent.

The place was Dushanbe, the capital of Tajikistan, a country few Westerners could correctly place on a map.

But you can bet your last ruble that Vladimir Putin knows exactly where Tajikistan is. Because the group that met there is the Russian president’s baby. It’s the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), consisting of six member states: Russia, China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan.

The SCO was founded in 2001, ostensibly to collectively oppose extremism and enhance border security. But its real reason for being is larger. Putin sees it in a broad context, as a counterweight to NATO (a position that the SCO doesn’t deny, by the way). Its official stance may be to pledge nonalignment, nonconfrontation, and noninterference in other countries’ affairs, but—pointedly—the members do conduct joint military exercises. Continue reading

SCO to admit new members

The SCO was always intended to be a counter-balance to NATO and the West. With the admission of new states such as India and Iran, it’s looking to tip the balance and push the west of of Asia and Eurasia. This also isn’t limited to a political capacity, but will also involve a military component.

Draft documents on the procedure of the admission new members to the Shanghai Cooperation Organization have been adopted. This is one of the main outcomes of the meeting of the foreign ministers of Russia, China, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Kirgizstan held in Dushanbe on Thursday.

The adoption of these documents at the next SCO summit will give the green light for admitting the four observer-states, India, Pakistan, Iran and Mongolia, to the six-member organization.

Documents will be submitted to the SCO summit for the adoption. The summit will be held in Dushanbe in September. At present, Tajikistan holds the SCO presidency. Continue reading

Russia attempts to draw Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan back into its orbit

According to the World Bank, Tajikistan is more dependent on remittances than any other country in the world. Last year migrant workers sent home the equivalent of 47% of Tajikistan’s GDP. Perhaps half of working-age males are abroad, most in Russia. Kyrgyzstan is third in the World Bank’s rankings, behind Liberia. One-fifth of its workforce are migrant workers.

The economic dependence of these two countries gives their former imperial master great influence. Whenever it is unable to wangle a favourable deal for a military base abroad, or it wants to play up nationalism at home, Russia threatens to introduce visas for Central Asians. And though Russia needs cheap labour, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan need jobs much more. Continue reading

Russia’s Putin eyeing military dominance in Central Asia amid water quarrels

Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan are landlocked and mountainous countries—75% and 90%, respectively—in Central Asia. The countries’ mountains provide abundance of potable water, which feed the two major rivers of Central Asia.  The scarcity of other natural resources understandably results in Bishkek’s and Dushanbe’s attempts to use the water more wisely—building hydropower plants (HPP) for generating electricity.  Dushanbe is aiming at erecting the tallest dam in the world—a 335-meter (about 1,000 feet) tall concrete wall on the Vakhsh River (turns into Amu-Darya River).  Kyrgyzstan, meanwhile, is securing Russia’s backing in building a 275-meter dam on the Naryn River (turns into Syr-Darya River). Continue reading