Reports: 5G Poses a Threat to Human Beings

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(Photo Credit: Lance Cpl. Alejandro Bedoya/U.S. Marine Corps)

 

Despite all of the reported benefits, the next generation of mobile communications poses significant health concerns.

Despite all of the reported benefits, from amazingly fast download speeds to a greatly expanded Internet of Things, fifth generation mobile communications, or 5G, poses some very real health dangers to human beings who may be exposed to it.

According to the Environmental Health Trust, today’s mobile communications networks rely on microwave electromagnetic radiation at frequencies up to 6 gigahertz. The new 5G will move to a higher frequency band from 6 GHz to 100 GHz, and potentially even higher. Continue reading

FBI warn ISIL hackers plan local blackouts in U.S. power grid

There doesn’t even need to be any hackers involved. Nine substations being taken out will send America back into the stone ages and claim upwards of 9 out of 10 American lives. That’s how safe the U.S. electrical grid is. The electrical grid in central California has already been attacked with sniper rifles in what’s likely a dry run. It was reported an entire year later after the incident, then whitewashed as a non-threat.

As for the rest of the infrastructure, control of SCADAs is key — something China and Russia likely can manipulate. From there, sewage systems could be forced to flood the streets and medication dosages for the sick and elderly could be manipulated.

 

The terror group’s hackers have attempted cyberattacks in the U.S., but aren’t skilled enough to succeed, the FBI said. Still, though, ISIL may have the cash to fund cyberattacks on U.S. targets.

“Strong intent. Thankfully, low capability,” John Riggi, a section chief in the FBI’s cyber division, told CNN. “But the concern is that they’ll buy that capability.” Continue reading

Communication With 50 Nuke Missiles Dropped in ICBM Snafu

Does America even know how much of a sad state the military and national security backbone is in?

If the news isn’t about the NFL, Kim Kardashian or the latest electronic gadget, the American Shopping Mall Regime either just doesn’t care or writes it off as conspiracy. Citizens get more outraged at the inability of a McDonald’s employee to calculate a simple order should the food ordering system crash, and even end up calling 911, too.

Don’t buy into the typical whitewash response of ‘everything is ok now’. This is a full-blown systematic and chronic crisis.

The Air Force swears there was no panic. But for three-quarters of an hour Saturday morning, launch control officers at F.E. Warren Air Force Base in Wyoming couldn’t reliably communicate or monitor the status of 50 Minuteman III nuclear missiles. Gulp.

Backup security and communications systems, located elsewhere on the base, allowed the intercontinental ballistic missiles to be continually monitored. But the outage is considered serious enough that the very highest rungs on the chain of command — including the President — are being briefed on the incident today.

A single hardware failure appears to have been the root cause of the disruption, which snarled communications on the network that links the five launch control centers and 50 silos of the 319th Missile Squadron. Multiple error codes were reported, includinglaunch facility down.” Continue reading

Securing Command — Strategic commander worried about cyber attacks on nuclear command and control

At times, news like this makes one wonder if it’s a strong case of déjà vu that was probably never fully admitted.

U.S. strategic nuclear weapons and the command systems that control them are vulnerable to cyber attacks although most are hardened against many types of electronic attacks, the commander of the U.S. Strategic Command said on Tuesday.

Air Force Gen. C. Robert Kehler said during a hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee that nuclear weapons and the communications used to control them are older and thus less vulnerable to disruption by computer network attacks.

“However, we are very concerned with the potential of a cyber related attack on our nuclear command and control and on the weapons systems themselves,” Kehler said. “We do evaluate that.” Continue reading