Top German Diplomat Calls for Bundeswehr Engagement in Syria

BERLIN (Own report) – Wolfgang Ischinger, Chairman of the Munich Security Conference, is calling for the Bundeswehr’s deployment in Syria. It is high time, to discuss “seriously” the creation of so-called safe havens and “no-fly zones in and around Syria,” according to Ischinger. This “of course” would call for the participation of the German Armed Forces and in relationship to the deployment of ground forces, “nothing can be ruled out.” Ischinger is also providing justification for going to war. Whereas Syria has been submerged in war, because of the arms supplies furnished by the West and its regional allies to insurgent militias – including Al Qaeda and the “Islamic State” (IS), this influential diplomat claims that the current “conflagration” is the consequence of Western non-intervention. These war plans are, however, a reaction to Russia’s growing influence also in the Middle East. In recent months, Moscow has been holding extensive negotiations in view of settling the Syrian war. In his speech before the UN General Assembly on September 28, President Putin is expected to propose a new anti-IS coalition, with inclusion of the Syrian government. Therefore, in the framework of the Western Alliance, Berlin would like to counter Russia’s growing role in international politics.

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No More Taboos For the German Army

Germany removes the last restraints on its use of the armed forces, while its defense minister declares that there will be “no taboos”.

The year 1993 pivotal for the German military. Germany established its armed forces in 1956, but memories of two world wars meant that they were restricted to defensive operations within nato territory.

In 1991, this slowly began to change. Thirty German soldiers deployed in Baghdad, Iraq, to help with airlift operations. The same year, 150 medics were sent with a United Nations mission to Cambodia.

The first substantial foreign mission came in 1993, with over 2,000 military personnel deploying to Somalia as UN peacekeepers. The same year, German soldiers joined in aerial operations over Yugoslavia.

The world had no problems with these operations. In fact, the UN and United States desperately wanted the German army to do more, but to many Germans, this was too much. Germany’s main left-wing party, the Social Democratic Party (spd), and the free market Free Democratic Party (fdp) complained to the German Constitutional Court that these deployments violated Germany’s Basic Law—its constitution. Continue reading

The German Path to an EU Army (1)

Have you ever wondered what the world would like, post-Pax Americana?

As America suicidally declines, here’s your next likely superpower to fill the vacuum: A German-led EU/United States of Europe with a European Army.

The structure is set and all it needs is a unifying factor to tie the knot, such as a large-scale Russian invasion of Ukraine or a large-scale islamic terrorist attack within Europe. Europe already has a high amount of disdain for NATO and would feel more comfortable without it.

Here we also see how much influence and control Germany already wields within Polish and Dutch military circles.

This is also mainly why Germany wants Great Britain out and the British want out. It’s a matter of sovereignty whereas the immigration ‘issue’ is only an excuse for Merkel wanting to push Britain out should Britain put a halt to it.

 

BERLIN (Own report) – The German government is accelerating the creation of an EU army by means of bilateral military cooperation. The German-Polish “declaration of intent” on military cooperation of the two countries’ armed forces, signed in the middle of the week, is the most recent example. The agreement includes the exchange and joint training of officers as well as “placing combat battalions under the other’s command.” Poland’s military already has more than 130 German-made Leopard 2 battle tanks with another 120 due to be added by 2015. A sales contract to this effect was signed last year, only a few months after an agreement “reinforcing” cooperation between the Navies of the two countries was signed. At the time, German Defense Minister Thomas de Maizière (CDU) spoke of a “totally new quality” in the military cooperation between Germany and Poland. His successor, Ursula von der Leyen (CDU), has gone a step further and had her ministry declare that the intended German-Polish military cooperation is a “trendsetting milestone for the development of European integrated military structures.” Continue reading