U.S. to Deploy Smaller Nuclear Warheads to Counter Russia’s Low-Yield Arms

The guided missile submarine USS Ohio (SSGN 726) stops for a personnel boat transfer

The guided missile submarine USS Ohio (SSGN 726) stops for a personnel boat transfer / Getty Images

 

Nuclear review warns of new dangers from China, Russia

The United States will deploy modified smaller nuclear warheads on submarine-launched ballistic missiles and re-deploy sea-launched nuclear cruise missiles to counter Russia’s plans for using small nuclear weapons.

The policy shift is outlined in the Pentagon’s Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) that calls for modernizing aging weapons and delivery systems but not building new, more efficient and safer warheads. Continue reading

Pakistan to Have 200 Nuclear Weapons by 2020: US Think Tank

Washington:  Pakistan has the fastest growing nuclear weapons programme in the world and by 2020 it could have enough fissile material to produce more than 200 nuclear devices, a top American think tank has said.

“Though many states are downsizing their stockpiles, Asia is witnessing a buildup. Pakistan has the fastest-growing nuclear programme in the world. By 2020, it could have a stockpile of fissile material that, if weaponised, could produce as many as 200 nuclear devices,” Council on Foreign Relations has said. Continue reading

Under-the-Radar Launchers

Obama administration continues to ignore Beijing’s illegal transfer of ICBM launchers to N Korea

Six Chinese transporter-erector launchers (TELs) were sold to North Korea in 2011 and were first revealed carrying new intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBM) during a Pyongyang military parade in April 2012.

The launchers are now part of North Korea’s newest and most-lethal road-mobile nuclear KN-08 missiles, which are capable of hitting parts of the western United States. Continue reading

NCA stresses full-spectrum deterrence

ISLAMABAD: The National Command Authority (NCA) decided on Thursday to further develop the country’s nuclear weapons programme for preserving “full spectrum deterrence” against any possible external aggression.

The decision was taken at a meeting of the National Command Authority — the principal policy making body on the research, development, production, use and security of the nuclear programme. The meeting was presided over by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif.

This was Mr Sharif’s first session on the nuclear policy after returning to the prime minister’s office in June for a third term. The prime minister had in his second tenure rejected all international pressure and conducted nuclear tests in 1998 in response to Indian nuclear tests. Continue reading