A New Global Arms Race

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Caption: An S-300 PMU-1 antiaircraft missile is launched during a military exercise. (Costas Metaxakis/AFP/Getty Images)

 

The world is becoming more dangerous than ever before. That’s the type of statement you may read in the newspaper or hear a presidential candidate say. But how to do you prove that it is true? One trend that gives us a good indication is military spending.

In 2011, the world was spending more on its military than in all of history. We have remained around that historic peak in the years since, although military expenditures have shrunk slightly each year. The world is still spending more than during the Cold War, World War ii or any other time.

The reason this indicates the danger in today’s world is not just as simple as saying, the more money spent on weapons, the more dangerous the world is. It matters who’s spending on it. And when you look at those facts, the picture is even more disturbing.

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Is the US Army Near a Breaking Point?

It’s very difficult to believe historical cuts, while the Sino-Soviet axis is modernizing and strengthening their militaries — even through severe economic crises — are in America’s national security interests. America’s nuclear deterrent is collecting dust and becoming outdated, plagued by cheating scandals and the purging of critical personnel. Meanwhile, outside the nuclear deterrent realm, other high ranking officers are being forced into early retirement for daring to go against the grain and admit the war against ISIS is being lost. In conclusion, it’s by design, and going according to plan.

The end of the world isn’t coming, but rather Pax Americana. When America finishes suiciding itself into the dustbin of history, the new world leaders filling the vacuum are going to be Germany, China and Russia.

 

Poland increases military spending in response to Russia’s belligerence

Poland has responded to Russia’s belligerence by raising its defence budget by 18 per cent, achieving the biggest increase in military spending of any country in Europe.

Haunted by memories of Soviet invasion, Poland is set to join the handful of Nato members who meet the alliance’s target of investing at least two per cent of national income in defence.

At present, this club consists only of America, Britain, Estonia and Greece. On present plans, Britain is likely to drop out of this group next year – exactly when Poland is due to join.

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Can the renminbi beat the dollar for currency supremacy?

China’s planned launch of an international payment system to process cross-border yuan transactions in September will challenge the US dollar’s dominance in global trade and help Beijing build a leading role in Asian and global financial markets.

The greenback’s dominance in global trade and financial markets has begun to weaken because of the currency’s co-dependence with US military power, which is seeing structural changes.

American military power also ensures security at home and creates a safe environment that attracts foreign investment in US assets and bonds and a desire to hold the US dollar, which is accepted in most parts of the world. Continue reading

The F-35 Has To Phone Texas Before Taking Off

The U.S. military ran the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter through a series of tests aboard the USS Nimitz super carrier in San Diego in early November. It performed adequately, with one exception — it needed to send its diagnostic data to Lockheed Martin in Fort Worth, Texas, before taking off. If the most recent exercises are any indication, the F-35 may need to phone home every time it sets out on a mission.

First, the good news. The plane flew through its aerial paces well enough and passed a majority of its flight tests. Continue reading