Europe’s stock markets PLUNGE amid fears ECB has run out of tools to save eurozone

THE European Central Bank (ECB) has shocked markets by today taking no action to prop up the eurozone, despite warning signs the economy is struggling to cope with Britain’s vote to leave the European Union (EU).

Stock markets in Europe were in the red after the ECB unexpectedly left policy unchanged amid the worrying outlook for the eurozone.

A flurry of dire data in the weeks after the Brexit vote has pointed towards a sharp slowdown for the bloc, prompting expectations the central bank would take decisive action.

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ITALY ON THE EDGE: Italian banks face further losses as investor fears grow over debt

CONFIDENCE in Italy’s banks and the wider economy is falling apart, as investors continue to digest Britain’s vote to leave the European Union (EU).

Pointing to real fears over the future of the bloc, Europe’s top stock markets have failed to recover from the shock of the Brexit vote.

In stark contrast, Britain’s premier index the FTSE 100 has left its continental counterparts in the dust. Continue reading

Europe on the BRINK: Financial disaster looms for Eurozone as markets plunge into the RED

EUROPE’s top stock markets plunged into the red AGAIN on Friday amid panic over the future of some of the continent’s biggest companies.

Germany’s DAX and France’s CAC both dropped this morning before later recovering following a dire day of trading yesterday, which could mark the return to market carnage witnessed at the start of the year.

Germany’s biggest banking stocks have been among the biggest casualties this week, with Deutsche Bank falling by almost nine per cent and Commerzbank down by almost five per cent. Continue reading

Goldman Asks, Is The Bundesbank “Ominously” Trying To Sabotage The ECB’s QE?

Goldman previously argued that the weak activity reading rattled a market that had been operating on a core thesis of strong US growth. The resulting uncertainty caused Bund yields and EUR/$ to rise, with the DAX also selling off on the day. Since then, something more ominous has come into play…

One clue has been the communications ping pong from the ECB. On May 18, Executive Board member Coeure said “the rapidity of the reversal in Bund yields is worrisome,” citing it as another example of “extreme volatility in global capital markets.”

ECB President Draghi sent the opposite message on Jun. 3, saying “one lesson is that we should get used to periods of higher volatility,” followed on Jun. 10 by Executive Board member Coeure stating that “the ECB does not intend to counter [Bund] volatility in the short term.”

Goldman took a dim view of all this in our last FX Views, even if a charitable interpretation is that President Draghi basically sent a dovish message on Jun.10 and simply didn’t want to signal “activism” in the face of short-term volatility. Continue reading

This Financial “Seismograph” Signals A Monetary Earthquake

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Stock markets in the U.S. are trading approximately 2% from their all-time highs, the German DAX has slightly retraced from its all-time highs, the Nikkei index in Japan has almost surpassed its 2000 highs in recent days, the Shanghai stock index used to be a laggard but is making up at an incredible pace (currently trading at 7-year highs). Indeed, it feels like nothing can go wrong.

We are not yet in bubble territory, and the market is not setting up for an implosion as it did in December 1999 or July 2008. However, we are in the midst of a monetary bubble, driven by an explosion of the monetary base and an implosion of interest rates. Paper assets, as opposed to hard assets, have been pumped up by the liquidity that is being funneled into the economic system and the markets. Continue reading

Germany Gives Greece One Final Ultimatum After Friday’s “Optimistic” Talks Devolve Into Disagreement And Confusion

On Friday, the main catalyst that launched the early ramp in the EURUSD, subsequently sending both the Dax over 12,000, and the US stock market soaring, was speculation and hope that the latest round of Greek talks on late Thursday night ahead of tomorrow key meeting between Tsipras and Merkel in Berlin, had gone well, and there was a reason to be optimistic about the near-term for a Greece which increasingly more see as on the verge of expulsion from the monetary union. We explained as much, although we added the provision that at this point it is likely too late to do much if anything about Greece in “German DAX Surges Over 12,000 On Greek Optimism, But The Money Has Run Out.”

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The Greek Bank Runs Have Begun: Two Greek Banks Request Emergency Liquidity Assistance

The first time the phrase Emergency Liquidity Assistance, or ELA, was used in the context of Greece was in August 2011, when Greece was imploding, when its banking sector was on (and past) the verge of collapse, and just before the ECB had to unleash a global coordinated bailout with other central banks including global central bank liquidity swap and unleash the LTRO to preserve the Eurozone.

As a reminder, this is what happened back then: “In a move described as the “last stand for Greek banks”, the embattled country’s central bank activated Emergency Liquidity Assistance (ELA) for the first time on Wednesday night.”

“Although it was done discreetly, news that Athens had opened the fund filtered out and was one of the factors that rattled markets across Europe. At one point Germany’s Dax was down 4pc before it recovered. The ELA was designed under European rules to allow national central banks to provide liquidity for their own lenders when they run out of collateral of a quality that can be used to trade with the ECB. It is an obscure tool that is supposed to be temporary and one of the last resorts for indebted banks.” Continue reading

Crisis stalks Europe again as deflation deepens, Germany stalls

Data from Germany, Italy and Portugal put pressure on ECB to act

Portugal has crashed into deep deflation and Italy’s inflation rate has fallen to zero as the eurozone flirts with recession, automatically pushing these countries further towards a debt compound spiral.

The slide comes amid signs of a deepening slowdown in the eurozone core, with even Germany flirting with possible recession. Germany’s ZEW index of investor confidence plunged from 27.1 to 8.6 in July, the sharpest fall since June 2012, during the European sovereign debt crisis. “The European Central Bank has to act now,” said Andrew Roberts, credit chief at RBS. Continue reading