Shifting Tides of Military Power in the South China Sea

A 2010 article that foretold what was to come and now is here:

 

Is U.S. naval power in the South China Sea the unstoppable force it once was?

Thirsting for the oil in the waters that break upon China’s shores, Beijing has recently intensified its claim to the entire 1.3 million square miles of the South China Sea. Since China’s assertion competes with claims by the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei and Taiwan, it has prompted a pledge from the U.S. for increased involvement in the disputes to guarantee free trade and navigation throughout the region. But a Wall Street Journal article about recent military trends in the South Pacific region suggests that Washington’s pledge is insufficiently backed, and more so every month.

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What It Would Really Take to Knock Out the Power Grid

The American homeland is one attack on only nine substations away from going in the dark. A critical portion also doesn’t even need to be hacked, as sniper rifle fire was enough to already get the job done on one power station in April of 2013. If the bad guys only wanted to wreak havoc instead of 100% destruction, they would take advantage of the vulnerable SCADA system, where medication dosages for example, could be manipulated.

Sadly, the most of what’s being done to mitigate such threats are only warnings written in articles like this. There’s a lot of lights and cameras, but no action.

 

 

As our electrical system lifts itself out of the stone age, the defense built around it will require added vigilance.

My favorite joke when I was 5 years old was, “Where will you be when the lights go out?” The answer, of course, is “in the dark,” though I used to make my very patient sister guess a bunch of other places first, which I used to think was absolutely hilarious.

We are fortunate that in this country having the lights unexpectedly go out is actually a pretty big deal, and quite rare. You don’t have to wonder whether the light will come on when you throw the switch, or if your computer will have enough power to boot up. The sodas in the fridge are always cold and our showers are always warm. It always just happens, so we more or less take it for granted. Continue reading

U.S., China Agree Not to Conduct, Support Cyber Theft

The only reason that the U.S. would make a deal with China is that China now does a better job at cyberwarfare and has the upper hand, thanks to years of Obama’s dismantling of America. What’s more, everyone knows China isn’t going to stick to the agreement and continue operations. This capitulation signals America is losing its edge.

 

U.S. President Barack Obama and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping have agreed that neither country’s government will conduct or “knowingly” support cyber theft of intellectual property or commercial trade secrets, an issue that has been a source of tensions.

“I indicated it [cyber theft] has to stop.” Obama said at a joint news conference after private talks with Xi at the White House Friday. “This is progress, but I have to insist that our work is not yet done.” Continue reading

South Korea Suffered 114,000 Cyberattacks in Five Years

For a very informative perspective on how often and to which magnitude cyberattacks are happening worldwide, and especially against the United States, see the following live map linked from another post:

America: In the Cybercrosshairs

 

South Korea has announced that its government institutions have suffered more than 114,000 cyber attacks since 2011.

The figures were published on Friday in a report by the country’s National Assembly’s Public Administration & Security Committee, technology news site CNET reported. The committee found that 114,035 cyber attacks, ranging from attempts to access classified information to leaking sensitive data, had been recorded between 2011 and June 2015. Less than one percent of the total attacks originated from IP addresses in North Korea. Continue reading

Bill Gertz Talks Cyberwar, S. China Sea, IS Intel Scandal on Secure Freedom Radio

When the United States goes into an economic crisis, expect China and Russia to take advantage of it and kick America while it’s down. This includes cyberattacks as mentioned or even economic warfare. In the end it will all lead to war against the United States because these are only a means to that end. Their purpose is to weaken America until it’s vulnerable enough for just that.

 

 

Washington Free Beacon Senior Editor Bill Gertz appeared on Secure Freedom Radio on Friday to discuss President Obama’s tepid response to Chinese expansion in the South China Sea, Russian cyberattacks against the United States, and an emerging scandal over the alleged politicization of intelligence about the Islamic State.

Gertz told host Michael Ledeen that President Obama has instructed the U.S. Navy not to challenge Chinese territorial claims in the South China Sea. Continue reading

NSA pinpoints China’s cyberattacks

https://i1.wp.com/twt-thumbs.washtimes.com/media/image/2015/08/12/8_122015_ring18201_s878x663.jpg

 

A secret National Security Agency document has revealed the massive nature of China’s cyberattacks against the United States, with nearly 700 intrusions in private-sector and government networks.

The cyberattacks were outlined on a map that pinpoints what are described by the electronic spy agency as “victims of Chinese cyber espionage over the past five years.” The map was first disclosed by NBC News.

The locations include Washington and the entire Eastern Seaboard, as well as key areas such as Silicon Valley in California, the locations of U.S. nuclear weapons laboratories, and nuclear missile and military bases. NSA detected the most attacks in California, with numerous strikes. Continue reading

China to strike first in hypothetical war with Japan: expert

A hypothetical war between China and Japan started by Beijing would involve devastating cyberattacks, missile barrages and secret weapon DF-21D “carrier killer” missiles, according to a scenario outlined by defense and security blogger Kyle Mizokami in US magazine The National Interest.

In such a scenario, Beijing would likely strike first. While China has not seriously prepared for a war against Japan, the People’s Liberation Army should have sufficiently analyzed Japan’s strengths and weaknesses to draw up a plan of attack on short notice. Mizokami envisions such a strategy to start off with a surprise attack from with PLA’s Second Artillery Corp using a “barrage of ballistic and cruise missiles” to “degrade Japan’s ability to defend itself.”

The situation grows more complex once the US actively involves itself defend Japan, but Mizokami believes the PLA has the firepower to deal enough damage to US forces to force Washington to “cut its losses, throw Japan under the bus, and sue for peace.” Continue reading

Hunting for Hackers, N.S.A. Secretly Expands Internet Spying at U.S. Border

This is why the ‘end of NSA spying‘ was such a joke. You can’t impose restrictions on an agency that has no oversight and is answerable to no one. Even if their hand was forced, they will find another way or duties will be passed on to another agency such as the DEA, which has already been spying on millions of cars and tapping phone lines of even non-suspects for decades.

 

WASHINGTON — Without public notice or debate, the Obama administration has expanded the National Security Agency‘s warrantless surveillance of Americans’ international Internet traffic to search for evidence of malicious computer hacking, according to classified N.S.A. documents.

In mid-2012, Justice Department lawyers wrote two secret memos permitting the spy agency to begin hunting on Internet cables, without a warrant and on American soil, for data linked to computer intrusions originating abroad — including traffic that flows to suspicious Internet addresses or contains malware, the documents show. Continue reading

Russia and China Vow Not to Hack Each Other

The strengthening is a telltale sign of America being the target of One Clenched Fist. First comes the social-economic integration, then comes the military. Both

 

Russia and China signed a cybersecurity agreement on May 8, saying they will not conduct cyberattacks against each other. The deal also said the two would work together to counteract technologies they perceive as destabilizing to their internal affairs.

The text of the agreement is posted on the Russian government’s website. It says the two nations also agreed to share information between law enforcement agencies. In addition, they will freely exchange technologies and work together toward security of their information infrastructure. Oleg Demidov, a cybersecurity consultant at the pir Center, said the deal was an “important step” for the two nations. He said it accelerates Russia’s “pivoting to the East.”

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Why An American And A Russian General Are Suddenly Very Worried About Nuclear War

Over the past several years, there has been an alarming escalation of two very disturbing trends: an increasing preponderance of cyberattacks on complex infrastructure (whether domestic or abroad and whether instigated by external sources or internally, in a false falg [sic] attempt to evolve the issue to the benefit of various military-industrial complex benficiaries) as well as around the globe, and a largely unexpected return to a Cold War footing, one catalyzed by the violent US-sponsored overthrow of the former Kiev government and the eagerness to escalate the resultant conflict exhibited by the Kremlin.

If one extends said trends, one would arrive at a very unpleasant conclusion: due to the porous nature of modern technology and the increasing prevalence of cyberattacks, coupled with Cold War-era nuclear doctrines and rising tensions between the two superpowers who are now back to a Cold War regime, a nuclear war has suddenly emerged yet again as a very real threat. Continue reading

Power grid’s failing infrastructure at risk of cyberattack

Please see the source for the video.

 

Tuesday’s power failure in Washington has once again raised questions about the vulnerability of America’s electric power grid.

Fox News National Security Analyst KT McFarland spoke to experts Darren Hammell and Jonathan Pollet about potential threats. Continue reading

Big-brand hard disk firmware worldwide RIDDLED with NSA SPY KIT

Have you also ever wondered if those constant Windows ‘updates’ throughout the years were more than updates?

It’s also interesting to note that the researchers come from Kaspersky Lab, a Russian company headquartered in Moscow, which produces anti-virus software (and more) that millions of Americans use and trust.

Having said that, are the Russians infiltrating American citizen’s computers as well as ‘high value’ targets?

 

Kaspersky: ‘Equation Group’ attacked ‘high value targets’

America’s National Security Agency (NSA) has infected hard disk firmware with spyware in a campaign valued as highly as Stuxnet and dating back at least 14 years, and possibly up to two decades, according to an analysis by Kaspersky labs and subsequent reports.

The agency is said to have compromised hard drive firmware for more than a dozen top brands, including Seagate, Western Digital, IBM, Toshiba, Samsung and Maxtor, Kaspersky researchers revealed. Continue reading

Massive Utah cyberattacks — up to 300 million per day — may be aimed at NSA facility

Five years ago, Utah government computer systems faced 25,000 to 30,000 attempted cyberattacks every day.

At the time, Utah Public Safety Commissioner Keith Squires thought that was massive. “But this last year we have had spikes of over 300 million attacks against the state databases” each day: a 10,000-fold increase.

Why? Squires says it is probably because Utah is home to the new, secretive National Security Agency computer center, and hackers believe they can somehow get to it through state computer systems. Continue reading

NOAA Employee Charged With Computer Breach Met Senior Chinese Official in Beijing

This is a new development in what was previously posted, showing the level of access and its official state support.

 

A federal weather service employee charged with stealing sensitive infrastructure data from an Army Corps of Engineers database met a Chinese government official in Beijing, according to court documents that reveal the case to be part of an FBI probe of Chinese economic espionage.

Xiafen “Sherry” Chen, an employee of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) office in Ohio, was arrested in October and charged in a federal grand jury indictment with illegally accessing the Army’s National Inventory of Dams (NID).

The NID is a sensitive database containing information on all U.S. dams. U.S. intelligence officials have said the database was compromised by Chinese hackers in 2013 as part of covert efforts by Beijing to gather sensitive information on critical U.S. infrastructure for possible use in a future conflict. Continue reading

China’s State-Funded Company Looks to Profit Off US Patents

Company founded to blackmail US innovators could damage US economy

The Chinese regime is getting into the patent trolling business, having set up a company that will start suing American companies for patent fraud. Experts believe the new Chinese company, which the regime seeded with $50 billion in fluff patents, could be detrimental to American innovation.

Patent trolls, officially called patent assertion entities, are companies that produce no goods. They make their profits by buying vague and outdated patents, then suing other companies for violating their patents. According to a press release from the nonprofit Citizen Outreach, patent trolls cost the U.S. economy $29 billion a year and destroy jobs.

China’s shiny new patent troll is a company called Ruichuan IPR Funds. The company is based in China’s main technology hub in Zhongguancun, Beijing. Continue reading