Currency War? China Devaluates Yuan in Response to Western Rating Agencies

Analysts pointed out several factors that have driven the yuan down. One of the most important among them is strengthening the dollar on expectations of a referendum of Britain leaving the European Union. The vote will take place on June 23.

Some analysts see the recent step to devaluate the yuan as part of its correction ahead of the possible interest rate hike by the US Federal Reserve.

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Currency War: Dragging the World Toward World War III

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Echoes of 1934 are thundering with increasing intensity.

In 1934, United States President Franklin Delano Roosevelt outlawed the private ownership of gold. After confiscating billions in bullion, Roosevelt shocked the world by revaluing it. The cost for an ounce of gold, previously set at $20.67, was suddenly $35. Overnight, Roosevelt devalued the dollar by 69 percent.

The president told the country that it was a radical effort to stimulate America’s economy. A cheaper dollar would make America’s exports less expensive and help American companies sell more products to the rest of the world, he said. More money would flow into America, and more jobs would be created.

It did those things. And it also marched the world another giant step closer to war. Continue reading

Stock market is 50% to 80% overvalued; experts warn historical crash now imminent

(NaturalNews) Despite the recent rebound in stock values following a major plunge caused by China’s currency devaluation and resultant market losses, a number of notable economists and distinguished investors say the worst is yet to come – and it could be catastrophic.

As reported by the The Sovereign Investor web site, billionaire Carl Icahn is among those who have recently tossed red flags into the air. Icahn recently declared in a national interview, “The public is walking into a trap again as they did in 2007.” Continue reading

Doomsday clock for global market crash strikes one minute to midnight as central banks lose control

China currency devaluation signals endgame leaving equity markets free to collapse under the weight of impossible expectations

When the banking crisis crippled global markets seven years ago, central bankers stepped in as lenders of last resort. Profligate private-sector loans were moved on to the public-sector balance sheet and vast money-printing gave the global economy room to heal.

Time is now rapidly running out. From China to Brazil, the central banks have lost control and at the same time the global economy is grinding to a halt. It is only a matter of time before stock markets collapse under the weight of their lofty expectations and record valuations.

The FTSE 100 has now erased its gains for the year, but there are signs things could get a whole lot worse.

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Clouds on US Horizon: Greek Debt Crisis Knocking on Washington’s Door?

While Greece is suffering from a protracted debt crisis, facing new tough reforms, the question arises whether if the United States will soon become incapable to handle its own growing debts, asks Romina Boccia, the Heritage Foundation’s Grover M. Hermann Fellow in Federal Budgetary Affairs.

“The United States differs from Greece in important ways. The US economy is much larger and better diversified. More than half of the US debt is held by creditors within its borders, rather than by foreign entities. Moreover, the United States also creates its own money, enabling it to devalue its currency and debt to avoid defaulting on payments for a lack of cash,” the analyst underscored.

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Federal Reserve Insider Alan Greenspan Warns: There Will Be a “Significant Market Event… Something Big Is Going To Happen”

 

With the Federal Reserve printing trillions upon trillions of dollars to keep the economic system afloat, many investors and financial pundits have surmised that the fundamental economic problems facing the United States during the crash of 2008 have been resolved. Stocks are, after all, at historic highs. Continue reading

Asia’s Currency War

Global finance chiefs may have denounced it, but that has not stopped Japan joining other central banks in driving its exchange rate lower. With Australia and South Korea forced to respond, will the Asia-Pacific region be the main battleground in a global currency war? Continue reading

On China’s Rising Hatred Of The Japanese, And Why The BoJ Just Doesn’t Get It

It is becoming increasingly evident that Japan is attempting to use monetary policy to paper over the cracks of imploding foreign policy decisions. The ‘storm in a teacup’ that has brought China and Japan into fierce rhetorical battles over the Senkaku (or Diaoyu) Islands is having far more deep-seated impacts on the people of the two nations – and implicitly their buying habits. Unfortunately for the embattled Japanese – they are the ones in need far more than vice versa. Continue reading