Coalition of Those Willing to Go to War (II)

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PARIS/BERLIN (Own report) – The European Intervention Initiative (Initiative européenne d’intervention, IEI) initiated by Paris and supported by Berlin, will begin work this week. Representatives of the ten participating states took this decision in the French capital, yesterday. France’s President Emmanuel Macron promoted the IEI, aimed at rapid deployment capability, in search of gaining support for his country’s over-stretched armed forces. So far, Berlin has been applying the brakes. The German government is focused on systematically merging European troops, for example, within the framework of the EU’s “PESCO” projects and integrating European arms industries with the help of subsidies from the EU Defense Fund. In the future EU budget, the EU Defense Fund is to be increased thirty-fold, to more than €17 billion. Despite all the dissention, Berlin (with PESCO) and Paris (with IEI) are both seeking to establish a European armed forces, which can be deployed on a global scale, independent of the USA.

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The EU is taking over defence policy by stealth

The European Common Security and Defence Policy is an attempt to protect Continental industrial interests from US competition

The UK government likes to pretend that EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) is harmless inter-government cooperation, which has no access to money, or legal sanctions, and is therefore a federalist paper tiger. These draft European Council Conclusions give the lie to that. Any Conservative prime minister should be wholly opposed to what these Conclusions so clearly intend. To sign the UK up to this programme is not just another step towards a Euro-Army, which has always been a dream of the federalist nations like Germany, but another blow to the UK’s already beleaguered defence industries, and another nail in the coffin of Nato, in order that Continental defence industries should not be exposed to US competition. Continue reading

‘More Europe, not less’ needed on security and defence

As the EU situation continues to get worse, the only consistent solution Europe has thought up and pushed for has been to further consolidate. The world’s next superpower is bringing its European Army with it.

An effective European security and defence policy would allow the EU to ‘project influence globally’, argues Maria Eleni Koppa.

European security and defence is a topic that has been attracting a lot of attention after the decision of the European council to hold a special discussion dedicated on security and defence – for the first time since 2008 – at the forthcoming December summit. In this context, on 21 November, the European parliament adopted the report on the implementation of European security and defence policy, concerning the positions of the parliament for the future of the common security and defence policy (CSDP). Continue reading

German Think Tanks Call for Consolidation of Europe’s National Defense Industries

One way or another, the emerging Fourth Reich will gain its European Army and United States of Europe. Consolidation, be it through economics, law, culture or defense industries, is just one step towards that goal. At the moment, it may not seem likely, as creating a European Army at one stroke is not feasible. However, as America continues to suicide itself, Germany cannot rely upon it or NATO much longer and military reorganization is now vital for Europe’s security. This is especially so since America is backing away from the Middle East and is also within closer proximity to a hostile Iran which openly welcomes a third world war so it can hasten the return of the Mahdi, and continues to increase its hegemony over the region. Germany recognizes this and will continue to use its ‘soft power’ to achieve its mid-term objectives.

BRUSSELS — A paper on German foreign and security policy prepared by two leading think tanks calls for a consolidation of national defense industries to ensure that Europe’s defense industry stays competitive in the long term.

The paper, “New Power New Responsibility: Elements of a German Foreign and Security Policy for a Changing World,” was presented here Oct. 30 by the Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (SWP) and the German Marshall Fund of the United States. It drew on expertise from working groups made up of government officials, parliament officials, think tanks and nongovernmental organizations such as Amnesty International.

“Germany is one of the few countries in the EU and NATO not to have a national security strategy or something similar. This means that there is no guidance to partners on what the country aspires to,” said Markus Kaim, a project leader from the SWP. “This project tries to fill that gap,” he said. Continue reading

EU To Consider Options for Deploying Battlegroups

While still in the planning and development phase, the United States of Europe is still well on its way to setting foot on the world stage. When you follow the money and trace the source of decisions that shape the social-political and economic landscape of Europe, all roads lead to Berlin and its Fourth Reich, via entities such as the European Commission, European Central Bank and the IMF — the “Troika”.

Enhancing its role as a “security provider” in “Southern neighborhood” implies the instability in the Middle East, including Israel.

More information on these categories can be found here:

European Army

United States of Europe

The Fourth Reich

BRUSSELS — Options for deploying European Union battlegroups —the EU’s rapid-response forces — will be discussed during a series of meetings Sept. 25-26.

The battlegroup discussion comes ahead of a meeting of EU defense ministers in November and a summit of EU heads of state and government on defense matters in December.

EU battlegroups are military units that support the EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP). Member states contribute personnel and resources to the units, which comprise about 1,500 troops, on a rotating six-month basis. EU battlegroups have been on standby since 2007, but they have yet to be used. Currently, a British-led battlegroup is on standby with contributions from the Netherlands, Sweden, Latvia and Lithuania. Continue reading