Trace levels of radioactive cesium-137 from Fukushima now being detected in Florida citrus fruits

(NaturalNews) Radioactive cesium from the 2011 Fukushima disaster is still being detected in citrus and other plants as far away as Florida, according to a report sent to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

In March 2011, multiple nuclear meltdowns took place at the Fukushima Daiichi plant in Japan. The explosions ejected massive amounts of radioactive material into the environment, most notably radioactive cesium isotopes. In the weeks after the disaster, winds carried airborne radionuclides to every corner of the globe. Most of the radioactivity, however, settled into the Pacific Ocean. Continue reading

Massive radiation plume from Fukushima continues drifting to U.S. West Coast

To be quite honest, the Pacific Ocean is dead. If you’ve been following the Natural Disasters category here or another website such as ENENEWS for some time, the mass die-offs of sea life, and dead animals washing up in the hundreds or thousands when they normally shouldn’t be, it isn’t hard to come to this conclusion.

Not surprisingly, in the mainstream media this information doesn’t exist.

 

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Approximately 800 terabecquerels’ worth of cesium-137 (Cs-137) alone is expected to reach North America by next year, accounting for just 5 percent of the Cs-137 spilled into the ocean as a result of the disaster.

Radioactivity already arriving

Radioactive cesium does not naturally occur on planet Earth and is found only as a result of human nuclear activities. Cs-137 is widely considered one of the most dangerous byproducts of nuclear activity, because it mimics the activity of potassium and therefore accumulates in soil and plants, and is actively taken up by the human body. Continue reading