The Elusive European Army

In both militarily intervention and investment in the defense industry, Europeans lack coordination and have lost credibility. Yet, after the French intervention in the Central African Republic, the issue has returned to the spotlight and will be discussed at the summit on December 19 and 20.

In 1991, the Belgian foreign minister of the time, Mark Eyskens, remarked on the EU’s incapacity to develop a common defence policy when he described Europe as “an economic giant, a political dwarf and a military worm.” In recent years, there is no denying that the EU has become more active in this field. But the grand and often expressed ambition for real investment in a common security and defence policy, which includes an independent military capacity, has yet to [sic] realised. And this continues to be the case at a time when global change is obliging Europeans to engage in a more serious consideration of security as an issue in common. Continue reading

The EU is taking over defence policy by stealth

The European Common Security and Defence Policy is an attempt to protect Continental industrial interests from US competition

The UK government likes to pretend that EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) is harmless inter-government cooperation, which has no access to money, or legal sanctions, and is therefore a federalist paper tiger. These draft European Council Conclusions give the lie to that. Any Conservative prime minister should be wholly opposed to what these Conclusions so clearly intend. To sign the UK up to this programme is not just another step towards a Euro-Army, which has always been a dream of the federalist nations like Germany, but another blow to the UK’s already beleaguered defence industries, and another nail in the coffin of Nato, in order that Continental defence industries should not be exposed to US competition. Continue reading

NATO sees great potential for co-operation with Ukraine

NATO Deputy Secretary General Alexander Vershbow has said that the North Atlantic Treaty Organization will support the European aspirations of Ukraine. At the same time, he noted that NATO respects Ukraine’s choice to adhere to the non-aligned status.

“The topic of Ukraine’s national security and its relations with international organizations is important, and recent developments in your country as well as in Russia, Republic of Moldova and Armenia have made it even more urgent,” he said. Continue reading

EU To Consider Options for Deploying Battlegroups

While still in the planning and development phase, the United States of Europe is still well on its way to setting foot on the world stage. When you follow the money and trace the source of decisions that shape the social-political and economic landscape of Europe, all roads lead to Berlin and its Fourth Reich, via entities such as the European Commission, European Central Bank and the IMF — the “Troika”.

Enhancing its role as a “security provider” in “Southern neighborhood” implies the instability in the Middle East, including Israel.

More information on these categories can be found here:

European Army

United States of Europe

The Fourth Reich

BRUSSELS — Options for deploying European Union battlegroups —the EU’s rapid-response forces — will be discussed during a series of meetings Sept. 25-26.

The battlegroup discussion comes ahead of a meeting of EU defense ministers in November and a summit of EU heads of state and government on defense matters in December.

EU battlegroups are military units that support the EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP). Member states contribute personnel and resources to the units, which comprise about 1,500 troops, on a rotating six-month basis. EU battlegroups have been on standby since 2007, but they have yet to be used. Currently, a British-led battlegroup is on standby with contributions from the Netherlands, Sweden, Latvia and Lithuania. Continue reading