‘Drunk’ snow-plough driver blamed for crash that killed Total oil boss claims he is being FRAMED and says he doesn’t drink because he suffers from a heart condition

Just as General Patton’s life was cut short during recovery in the hospital after an ‘accident’.

Just as the Polish plane flying into Moscow to land crashed, decapitating the entire staunch anti-Communist leadership of Poland (See complete list here). The random person who moments after the crash filmed the aftermath with gunfire audio in the background supposedly wound up hospitalized, was recovering, then all of a sudden died. Explosive traces were even found on the plane after further investigation.

Although foul play is not certain, ‘accidents’ do happen between governments and intelligence circles. Christophe de Margerie, could very well have had enemies within the EU, which is scrambling to be free from Russian energy. He could’ve also shunned (or had been told to) a deal from Putin. Or, it was simply an accident due to incompetence. Take your pick.

 

  • Christophe de Margerie, 63, was only passenger on Falcon 50 at Vnukovo
  • Plane is thought to have had three crew members on board who also died
  • Aircraft collided with clearing machine on take-off and was going to Paris
  • Married father-of-three Mr De Margerie was Total chief executive for 7 years
  • Snow plough driver was injured and is being questioned by police

The snowplough driver blamed for the air crash which killed the chief executive of oil giant Total has denied being drunk at the wheel of his vehicle.

Vladimir Martynenkov’s lawyer insisted his client was not guilty of causing the air crash which killed Christophe de Margerie and three others and totally denied the ‘groundless’ accusation that Mr Martynenkov was drunk.

The denials seem to imply Mr Martynenkov believes he is being framed. After 24 hours in detention so far, he is today expected to be formally arrested, allowing investigators to question him over a longer period. Continue reading

CEO of French oil giant Total dies in jet crash at Moscow’s Vnukovo Airport

The CEO of France’s oil and gas giant Total, Christophe de Margerie, was among four people killed in a business jet crash at Vnukovo Airport in Moscow after the aircraft hit a snowplow on take-off.

Total’s chairman and CEO was the only passenger in the Falcon 50 business jet besides three crewmembers who were also French citizens.

“Total confirms with deep regret and great sadness that Chairman and CEO Christophe de Margerie died just after 10pm (Paris time) on October 20 in a private plane crash at Vnukovo Airport in Moscow, following a collision with a snow removal machine,” the company said in a statement. Continue reading

UPDATE 1-Total CEO calls for bigger euro role in oil payments

(Reuters) – Oil major Total’s chief executive said on Saturday the euro should have a bigger role in international trade although it was not possible to do without the U.S. dollar. Continue reading

France hits out at dollar dominance in international transactions

France’s political and business establishment has hit out against the hegemony of the dollar in international transactions after U.S. authorities fined BNP Paribas $9 billion for helping countries avoid sanctions.

Michel Sapin, the French finance minister, called for a “rebalancing” of the currencies used for global payments, saying the BNP Paribas case should “make us realize the necessity of using a variety of currencies”.

He said, in an interview with the Financial Times on the sidelines of a weekend economics conference: “We [Europeans] are selling to ourselves in dollars, for instance when we sell planes. Is that necessary? I don’t think so. I think a rebalancing is possible and necessary, not just regarding the euro but also for the big currencies of the emerging countries, which account for more and more of global trade.”

Christophe de Margerie, the chief executive of Total, France’s biggest company by market capitalization, said he saw no reason for oil purchases to be made in dollars, even if the benchmark price in dollars was likely to remain. Continue reading