Forgetting National Security, Ignoring Truth

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The 1992 presidential election turned on one key phrase: “It’s the economy, stupid.” The Cold War had been won. America was the sole superpower of the world. We had just won the Gulf War. And, Americans were tired. We wanted to enjoy our prosperity. It was at that moment that we officially began to separate and silo the critical issues of the day. President Reagan, twelve years before, had integrated three critical issues and focused the whole of his administration on them. These were known collectively as Reagan’s “three-legged stool.” Judeo-Christian Values. Free Market Economics. Strong National Defense. But when Clinton arrived, we were told that the economy mattered most. What a President does in his private life is irrelevant so long as the economy is booming, or so we were told. Who cares if something called al Qaeda attacks targets overseas? Why should that matter as long as we have the most powerful weapons? Continue reading

Japan’s master plan to destroy the Chinese Navy in battle

It seems that Japan is developing plans to craft its own Anti-Access/Area-Denial (A2/AD) strategy—or what one former Japanese official describes as “maritime supremacy and air superiority”—against the Chinese Navy.

The plan itself, detailed by Reuters, makes a tremendous amount of good sense:

“Tokyo is responding by stringing a line of anti-ship, anti-aircraft missile batteries along 200 islands in the East China Sea stretching 1,400 km (870 miles) from the country’s mainland toward Taiwan. . .

Continue reading

Chinese Navy Threatens Plane in International Airspace

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A screen capture from the BBC “Flying close to Beijing’s new South China Sea islands.”

 

A BBC reporter is among the crew of a plane warned to leave open waters.

Journalist Rupert Wingfield-Hayes recently took flight in a civilian-piloted plane to gauge what sort of reaction his presence might invite upon flying over the Spratly Islands—a field of reefs, atolls and small land masses located off the coast of the Philippines in the South China Sea of the Pacific Ocean, through what is widely recognized as international airspace. Continue reading

China to Extend Military Control to Indian Ocean

The Chinese regime said it’s wrapping up its construction of artificial islands in the South China Sea, and all signs suggest its next big push will be into the Indian Ocean.

Conflicts are already surfacing. India was caught off guard in May, when the Chinese regime docked a submarine in the nearby port of Karachi in Pakistan. Close to two months later, on July 1, Chinese defense spokesman senior Col. Yang Yujin tried lightening the concern by saying the Chinese navy’s activities in the Indian Ocean are “open and transparent.”

The same day, a very different announcement was made by a senior captain from China’s National Defense University. He warned India, saying they cannot view the Indian Ocean as their backyard. Continue reading

This Is The Insane Video China Just Put Out Showing It Attacking The U.S.

First the the nuclear-capable carrier killer missiles were introduced, then Chinese warships off the coast of Alaska, and now a video of China attacking America.

The hints of which direction Sino-American relations are going couldn’t be any bigger.

Please see the article source for more screencaps.

 

 

A small group of Chinese Navy ships showed up near Alaska earlier this week during President Obama’s visit to the northern state, mostly as a “we’re here” message. But then, as the Chinese People’s Liberation Army marched in a Beijing parade, someone simultaneously put out this completely nuts video of a naval attack on an American fleet, and on an American base that looks suspiciously like the one on the Japanese island of Okinawa.

If that wasn’t stronger than a implicit “we’re here” message, I’m not sure what is. Couple that with news from earlier today showing that the Chinese Navy actually passed through American waters under the “Right of Innocent Passage” (something that the U.S. Navy is quite familiar with on its own), and you’ve got something quite explicit indeed.

First spotted by the Council on Foreign Relations, it’s not exactly subtle. It wasn’t the PLA Navy attacking a generic foreign navy, and a generic foreign base either. China’s enemy, in this example, very clearly resembled the United States, after a Chinese base suffered a first strike of its own. Continue reading

Russia and China to stage naval drills in Sea of Japan, train for beach landing

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Major amphibious assault ship takes part in the Russian-Chinese “Joint Sea-2015” drills in the Mediterranean. / RIA Novosti

 

A Chinese squadron has left the port of Qingdao in Shandong province on Saturday and headed for Russia’s Vladivostok to take part in the bilateral naval exercise to be held in Peter the Great Bay on August 20-28.

A source close to the operation told Xinhua news agency that the drills “are not targeted at any third party and are not relevant to the regional status quo,” stressing that the exercise is part of annual exchange program between Chinese and Russian militaries.

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China puts bombers to long-range test via Miyako Strait

Drill comes after PLA tells US aircraft to leave Fiery Cross Reef airspace

China’s air force sent a group of strategic bombers through the Miyako Strait south of Okinawa in a long-range drill for the first time yesterday as part of military exercises in the western Pacific.

The manoeuvre came as US-based CNN reported that the Chinese navy repeatedly warned a US surveillance plane to leave airspace over artificial islands that Beijing is building in the disputed South China Sea.

Continue reading

Djibouti President: China Negotiating Horn of Africa Military Base

As was written, the gates to the world would be taken away from Great Britain and the U.S..

 

DJIBOUTI — China is negotiating a military base in the strategic port of Djibouti, the president told AFP, raising the prospect of US and Chinese bases side-by-side in the tiny Horn of Africa nation.

“Discussions are ongoing,” President Ismail Omar Guelleh told AFP in an interview in Djibouti, saying Beijing’s presence would be “welcome.”

Djibouti is already home to Camp Lemonnier, the US military headquarters on the continent, used for covert, anti-terror and other operations in Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere across Africa. Continue reading

China Unveils Three New Nuclear-Powered Attack Submarines

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The Chinese Navy is preparing to commission three new, nuclear-powered attack submarines with a vertical launching system able to fire supersonic anti-ship missiles, a report from China Daily said.

The China Central Television showed satellite pictures earlier this week of the three submarines anchored at an unidentified port claiming that the new submarines are China’s most advanced Type-093G attack submarines.

“The Type-093G is reported to be an upgraded version of Type-093, China’s second-generation nuclear-powered attack submarine, which entered active service several years ago. With a teardrop hull, the submarine is longer than its predecessor and has a vertical launching system,” according to the China Daily report. Continue reading

China Is Mass-Producing Islands To Extend Its Strategic Borders

A dramatic change is taking place in the South China Sea where, since the beginning of this year, Beijing has created at least five new islands by dredging rock and sand and pumping it into reefs to form new land. By doing so, the Chinese are sending a blunt message to its neighbors and the U.S.: Keep out.

As a BBC News special report notes, China’s island building is aimed at addressing what it views as a serious strategic deficit:

In 2012 the Communist Party reclassified the South China Sea as a “core national interest”, placing it alongside such sensitive issues as Taiwan and Tibet. It means China is prepared to fight to defend it.

This is confirmed by Prof Yan Xuetong of Beijing’s Tsinghua University— a pro-government academic well known for presenting the Communist Party’s view to the outside world.

Continue reading

Three nuclear subs spotted near PLA Navy’s Hainan base

The People’s Liberation Army Navy has deployed three nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines to its South Sea Fleet base on the southern island province of Hainan, according to the Manila-based InterAksyon news website in a report published July 8. Continue reading

Move aims to seal off ‘first island chain’: analysts

Tokyo boosts missile defense

Japan is moving to strengthen its military capability to block the Chinese navy with more advanced surface-to-ship missiles (SSM) scheduled to be deployed in the country’s southwest in 2016.

Japan’s Ground Self-Defense Force will start to deploy Type 12 SSMs in 2016 in Kumamoto prefecture on the island of Kyushu to “guard from China’s attack to some extent,” the Sankei Shimbun newspaper reported Sunday. Continue reading

Rising red tide: China’s navy, air force rapidly expanding its size and reach

Away from the Chinese military’s expanding capabilities in cyberspace and electronic warfare, Beijing is growing the size and reach of its naval fleet, advancing its air force and testing a host of new missiles, the Pentagon said Thursday.

An annual report to Congress on China’s evolving military capability concluded that the modernization was being driven in part by growing territorial disputes in the East and South China seas, as well as by Beijing’s desire to expand its presence and influence abroad. Continue reading

China nuclear subs ‘gallop to depths of ocean’

While “assassin’s mace” may sound like new vocabulary for some, it’s not. Assassin’s mace has been mentioned quite a few times by the PLA over the years as a method of catching the United States off guard by blinding it before it strikes the American homeland. Blinding US satellite capability is part of this strategy, which would in turn wreak havoc or severly hamper the US Navy’s ability to defend the Pacific or the US Air Force’s ability to fully function as it should. The US is overly reliant upon technology at its own peril, and at the same time refuses to enter the space arena where China and Russia are advancing their “Star Wars” programs in order to attain full spectrum dominance over America.

Further information on “assassin’s mace” can be found here:

PART 2: The assassin’s mace

China Looks to Undermine U.S. Power, With ‘Assassin’s Mace’

China’s ‘shashou jiang’ ignores Western ‘rules’ of geostrategy

Who can awaken sleeping West to China threat? Hollywood?

China’s Assassin’s Mace weaponry (informative forum source)

Further information can be found on the “Star Wars” programs here:

China Expands Space Warfare Capabilities

China Space Program Ramping Up Capabilities, Pentagon Says

China Testing New Space Weapons

Russia to deploy ‘star wars’ missile system in 2017, report says

China Launches Three ASAT Satellites

China has revealed that its first fleet of nuclear submarines has started sea patrols, in the latest sign of its military’s growing confidence which has raised concerns in the region.

Xinhua, the official news agency, released photographs of what appeared to be Xia-class vessels – China’s first generation of nuclear-armed submarines, which are several decades old – saying they were being “declassified” for the first time.

It said the submarines would “gallop to the depths of the ocean, serving as mysterious forces igniting the sound of thunder in the deep sea”, and be an “assassin’s mace that would make adversaries tremble”. Continue reading

Russia’s Military Is Back

Earlier this year, in an address delivered on the day devoted to the “defenders of the Fatherland,” the Russian president proclaimed: “Ensuring Russia has a reliable military force is the priority of our state policy. Unfortunately, the present world is far from being peaceful and safe. Long obsolete conflicts are being joined by new, but no less difficult, ones. Instability is growing in vast regions of the world.”

This is not empty talk. The rhetoric has been matched by a concurrent allocation of resources; Russia is now engaged in its largest military buildup since the collapse of the Soviet Union more than two decades ago, with major increases in defense spending budgeted each year to 2020. Putin has pushed for this program even over the objections of some within the Kremlin who worried about costs and the possible negative impact on Russian prosperity; opposition to the expansion of military spending was one of the reasons the long-serving Finance Minister Aleksei Kudrin left the cabinet two years ago.

The rest of the world is taking notice. Continue reading