Ex-DIA Official Charged as Beijing Spy Used Chinese Cell Phones

Ron Hansen

Ron Hansen / LinkedIn

 

Former case officer colluded with MSS for years and sought work as a Chinese mole in DIA, FBI

A former Defense Intelligence Agency officer charged with spying for Beijing’s intelligence service used Chinese cell phones to communicate with his spy handlers, according to an FBI document.

Ron Rockwell Hansen, was arrested by the FBI on Saturday and charged with attempted transfer of defense secrets to China and other crimes. Continue reading

Chinese spies may have read all MPs emails for a year

One reason in particular nations conducting espionage find personal relationships and domestic politics useful is that information on personal relationships can be used in the future for blackmail and knowledge of domestic politics gives them further understanding into the thinking of citizens. Understanding the thinking of citizens makes it much easier, for example, an infiltrated media to manipulate information to the point where they can steer the thinking of cultures.

The Chinese intelligence agencies that penetrated Australia’s parliamentary computer network in 2011 may have been inside the system for up to a year and had access to documents and emails that reveal the political, professional and social links across the political world, according to seven sources with knowledge of the breach.

Security and parliamentary sources said Chinese agencies obtained remote, system administrator access to the Parliament’s computer network, which “effectively gave them control of it”. Continue reading

Beijing’s Backdoors

Senior members of the House Intelligence Committee said on Thursday that two Chinese telecommunications companies are helping Chinese intelligence by providing access to data moved on computer and network equipment sold to governments and companies around the world.

Rep. Michael Rogers, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, said Huawei Technologies Co. and ZTE Corp. could be compelled to assist China’s government if asked for data that passes through the company’s network routers. Furthermore, malicious code could be inserted in the companies’ software and exploited by China’s government, he said during a committee hearing.

Rogers (R., Mich.) warned that computer equipment is vulnerable to “backdoors and malicious” code that can be inserted by foreign countries.

According to U.S. officials, both Huawei and ZTE have close ties to the Chinese government and military.

In one case, according to other U.S. officials, China several years ago sold counterfeit routers disguised as Cisco Systems routers to the Pentagon. The equipment was found to be transmitting signals as part of an apparent intelligence-gathering effort. The counterfeit routers were eventually traced to China.

Full article: Beijing’s Backdoors (Washington Free Beacon)