Report: Cracks Forming in Chinese Leadership Over Trade War

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(Photo Credit: The Kremlin/www.kremlin.ru)

 

One of Xi Jinping’s closest advisers is now on the hot seat in Beijing.

A new report today published by Reuters states that sources inside the Communist Party of China indicate the party’s leadership is growing increasingly divided over President Xi Jinping’s approach to the current trade war with the U.S.

The article focuses much of the internal consternation with Xi’s “ideology chief,” strategist Wang Huning, a prominent and influential academic whose “strident views on Chinese power” has attracted favor within several quarters of the CPC, but has also come under attack. He is also responsible for the “China Dream” espoused by Xi at the most recent party congress. Continue reading

BRICS in a multipolar world

This week, South Africa is hosting the 10th annual gathering of BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa). When the first BRIC summit was held in 2009 (South Africa was added in 2010), the world was in the throes of a financial crisis of the developed world’s making, and the increasingly dynamic BRIC bloc represented the future. By coming together, these countries had the potential to provide a geopolitical counterweight to the West.

But Western commentators have long underestimated that potential, forcing BRICS to demand greater representation in global-governance institutions. In 2011 and 2012, BRICS challenged the process of selecting leaders at the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. But, lacking a united front behind them, a European (Christine Lagarde) and an American (Jim Yong Kim) continued to preside over those organizations. And though BRICS did get these institutions to reform their voting structures to give developing countries greater weight, the US and Europe still wield disproportionate power. Continue reading

Special Report: How China’s shadowy agency is working to absorb Taiwan

This is a Chinese ‘charm offensive’ in full motion. It’s of course more wise than gunboat diplomacy, for which they already have thousands of missiles ready at a moment’s notice to rain down on Taiwan, but equally as dangerous in the long-term for the United States. The end-game aim for China is to push America completely out of Asia, for a regional Asian bloc and have nations (for example) such as Japan, both Koreas and Vietnam under its protectorate umbrella.

 

(Reuters) – Ever since a civil war split the two sides more than 60 years ago, China has viewed Taiwan as a renegade province that needs to be absorbed into the mainland. To that end, the legion of Taiwanese businessmen working in China is a beachhead.

In June, hundreds of those businessmen gathered in a hotel ballroom in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen. They were there to toast the new head of a local Taiwan merchants’ association. They sipped baijiu liquor and ate seafood as a troupe performed a traditional lion dance for good luck. An honored guest, senior Communist Party official Li Jiafan, stood to deliver congratulations and a message.

“I urge our Taiwanese friends to continue to work hard in your fields to contribute to the realization of the Chinese dream as soon as possible,” said Li, using a nationalist slogan President Xi Jinping has popularized. “The Chinese dream is also the dream of the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait – our dream of reunification.”

Li, who ended his speech to beating drums and loud applause, is a department chief in the Shenzhen arm of the United Front Work Department, an organ of the Communist Party’s Central Committee. Its mission: to spread China’s influence by ultimately gaining control over a range of groups not affiliated with the party and that are often outside the mainland.

United Front documents reviewed by Reuters, including annual reports, instructional handbooks and internal newsletters, as well as interviews with Chinese and Taiwanese officials reveal the extent to which the agency is engaged in a concerted campaign to thwart any move toward greater independence by Taiwan and ultimately swallow up the self-ruled island of 23 million. Continue reading

Xi Jinping pushes his Taiwan policy

With the US in suicidal free-fall, China knows now is the time for charm diplomacy. All it has to do is point the finger in America’s direction to show that it’s not a reliable partner, that China is able to push American military out of the Asia Pacific with its missile technology. Taiwan, as well as the Koreas and Japan will shift towards an Asian bloc/union with China being the umbrella protectorate. It’s better to join the team if, without US backing, you can’t beat them.

 

Chinese president Xi Jinping, who is also the general secretary of the Communist Party of China’s Central Committee, said during his speech on Sept. 26 that “one country, two systems” is his country’s formula for Taiwan’s future, triggering heated debates in Taiwan.

In a speech delivered during a meeting with a Taiwanese delegation composed of the island’s pro-reunification groups, Xi spelled out China’s bottom line on the Taiwan issue before the fourth plenary session of the 18th Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee, slated to be held from Oct. 20 to 23.

Xi espoused the “one country, two systems” proposal for unification, mainly based on his judgments of CPC power, China’s role in foreign relations, and the situation in Taiwan. Continue reading