China may overtake Japan in naval power this year: report

Since Xi Jinping became China’s top leader, there has been a noticeable change in the country’s foreign policy, according to Duowei News, an outlet run by overseas Chinese.

Beijing has implemented a shift in the geopolitical focus of its global strategy, which has seen the relationship with the US and with the European Union displaced as first priority ties for the country. At the same time, China has strengthened its sea power, with many speculating that the power of the PLA Navy is set to overtake that of Japan in 2015.

At the end of November, as the US was scrambling to find a way to contain Russia, a low-profile but important meeting was being held in Beijing — the Central Conference on Work Relating to Foreign Affairs. At the meeting several leaders made key speeches that indicated a change in China’s external geopolitical strategy. Continue reading

5 Things to Look for at the Chinese Regime’s Big Political Conclave

The most important meeting this year on the calendar of the Chinese Communist Party opened Oct 20 in Beijing and runs through Oct. 23. At the Fourth Plenary Session of Central Committee of the 18th National Party Congress there are 5 issues that can be expected to be covered.

How Far Will Judicial Reform Go?

“With a law that cannot be put into practice, the law would simply be useless words. And the rule of law would be an empty talk,” said head of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) Xi Jinping during the central political conference in January this year. “Lax law enforcement and unjust judicial system are the results of only a handful of police officers have a sense of professional moral values.”

“Some of the lawyers, judges and prosecutors are working together. And together they become some sort of judicial brokers,” Xi said.

Continue reading

‘China Does Not Want the Korean Peninsula to Be Unified’

China will likely never give up being North Korea’s puppet master so long as it gives legitimacy and recognition on the world stage as a third-party negotiator or go-to for the northern Communist regime.

Of course, the North Korean leadership is worried that China will use its dominance over North Korea’s economy to involve itself in internal North Korean affairs. The execution of Jang Song Thaek may have been a result of such concerns.

At the same time, China cannot help but direct more discontent and annoyance at North Korea. North Korea is staying afloat on Chinese assistance, but the country has implemented a political stance that is causing much difficulty for the Chinese.

Moreover, China’s leaders remember little about the Korean War and have little reason to continue helping North Korea. Continue reading