75% of world’s fish have been wiped out by mankind … Collapse of marine ecosystems now imminent

(NaturalNews) Many people point their fingers at climate change, underwater weapons testing, ocean quakes and biodiversity, as reasons behind the collapse of the marine ecosystem. While there’s something to be said for these issues as contributing factors in the decline of marine life, the fact remains that the ongoing after-effects of Fukushima’s radiation plays a significant role too. Continue reading

Fukushima nuclear waste now being found off all U.S. states on West Coast — Detected near shorelines of California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska this summer — Highest radiation just miles from San Francisco (MAP)

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: In the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami off Japan, the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant released cesium-134 and other radioactive elements into the ocean at unprecedented levels. Since then, the radioactive plume has traveled west across the Pacific… any cesium-134 detected in the ocean today must have come from Fukushima… We expect samples from the surface waters of the western Pacific that have not been contaminated by the Fukushima source to have 137Cs activity of between 1 and 2 Bq/m3 and for 134Cs to be “below detection.” Continue reading

Officials: Fukushima Has Now Contaminated 1/3 Of The Worlds Oceans

And it’s still wildly out of control and leaking as if it began yesterday, with no end in sight.

 

A field study found that two filter cartridges were coated, which showed elements of cesium, a radioactive substance.

 

The Pacific Ocean – in fact almost one-third of the Globe – is thought to have been contaminated from the leak out from the Fukushima  Nuclear Disaster.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), seeking to promote the peaceful use of Nuclear Power, in 2011 established with the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) Member States, a joint IAEA Technical Cooperation (TC) project in the region of the Pacific Ocean. It was established after the Fukushima disaster when a tsunami caused by a major earthquake on 11 March 2011, disabled the power supply and cooling of three Fukushima Daiichi reactors, causing a nuclear accident. As a result a large quantity of radioactive material was admitted into the Pacific Ocean. Continue reading

Tracking Fukushima radiation across the Pacific

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Image credit: Bedford Institute of Oceanography

 

 

It took just over two years for the radioactive plume from Fukushima, Japan, to travel via ocean currents and reach the shores of North America, researchers say.

A radiation plume from the March, 2011 nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan took about 2.1 years to travel via ocean currents and ultimately cross the waters of the Pacific Ocean to reach the shores of North America. That’s according to to a study published at the end of 2014 (December 29) by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,

Following the March 11, 2011 magnitude 9.0 earthquake and resulting tsunami in the Pacific Ocean, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant released cesium 134 and cesium 137 into the ocean. Researchers knew that a small percentage of this radioactive material would be carried by currents across the Pacific, eventually reaching the west coast of North America. Continue reading

Fukushima’s radioactive waste reaches North America

(NaturalNews) Radiation from the Fukushima explosion has reached North America. On April 12, 2015, scientists collected seawater with radioactive isotopes from the Fukushima meltdown. The samples were collected at Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, just north of the United States border, at the Ucluelet Aquarium. The report of the findings were made by Ken Buesseler, senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), located in Cape Cod, Mass. He believes that the amount of radioactivity detected was many times smaller than that of a dental X-ray. Mainstream media sources such as Reuters have also commented on the findings. Continue reading

Fukushima Disaster Radiation Finally Hits North America Four Years After Nuclear Incident In Japan

The Inquisitr reported on the results of the Fukushima Disaster in which both plants and animals are affected due to the radiation spill into the Pacific Ocean. Eventually, people feared that said radiation would effect the United States. That fear suddenly became more a reality when radiation was detected just 100 miles from the shore of California.

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Radioactivity from crippled Fukushima reactors turns up off B.C. coast

VANCOUVER — Radioactivity from Japan’s crippled nuclear reactors has turned up off the British Columbia coast and the level will likely peak in waters off North America in the next year or two, according to a Canadian-led team that’s intercepted the nuclear plume.

The team’s seawater measurements reveal Fukushima radioactivity first showed up 1,500 kilometres west of British Columbia in June 2012, more than a year after the Japanese nuclear accident. Continue reading

Fukushima radioactive cesium reaches Canada

Scientists say that very little traces of toxic cesium-134 and cesium-137 from Fukushima nuclear power plant have been detected in Canada, Vancouver.

Cesium-137 has a half-life of 30 years, but cesium-134 has a half-life of just two years, indicating that the material detected in Vancouver is of recent vintage, and not a product of older nuclear waste, according to the international press. Continue reading