German-Russian Flagship Projects

KASSEL/MOSCOW (Own report) – The German natural gas company, Wintershall Holding GmbH, is intensifying cooperation with Russia’s Gazprom and will receive direct access to large Siberian gas fields. Last Friday, the two companies announced they would finalize an asset swap this year, which would allow Wintershall to participate in the exploitation of two blocks in the Achimov formation of the Urengoy natural gas field. The deal had been signed back in 2013, but was canceled by Moscow in late 2014, because of the escalation of the conflict with the West. This resumption enables BASF’s subsidiary, Wintershall, to continue its rise in the global gas sector. The Austrian company, OMV, since July 1, under the management of former Wintershall CEO, Rainer Seele, is also participating. Gazprom, Wintershall, OMV and other gas companies have agreed to expand the Russia-to-Germany “Nord Stream” pipeline with two more pipelines. German business circles explicitly describe both as “flagship projects” and push for a rapid re-intensification of cooperation at the political level.

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Germany must use military more, says president

It won’t be like before the first two World Wars. First comes the political and economic unions of Europe after sovereign nations are subjugated via economic warfare (i.e. forced bailouts in exchange for sovereign rights), as further integration is always the solution to the problems according to Germany. Knowing the European Union would fail and exploiting the induced turmoil was part of the plan. It’s certainly heading for a breakup, but a remaining core of the ‘willing’ will bring a United State of Europe and its respective European Army under the Fourth Reich. It isn’t happening overnight, but a new chapter of world history is in the making.

Germany must stop using its past as a “shield” and use its armed forces more frequently and decisively, federal president Joachim Gauck has warned, in the clearest sign yet that country’s longstanding aversion to the use of its military may be beginning to crack.

“Germany can’t carry on as before,” Mr Gauck said on Friday, pulling few punches in a speech that cited German indifference and European navel-gazing amid “rapid” and “dramatic” new threats to the “open world order”.

“When the last resort – sending in the Bundeswehr – comes to be discussed, Germany should not say no on principle,” the president said. Continue reading