Bundesbank President Says ECB Monetary Policy ‘Grave Decision’

The head of Germany’s central bank has said that quantitative easing will not solve the economic problems of the Eurozone.

MOSCOW, January 25 (Sputnik) – The president of the German central bank, Jens Weidmann, has expressed his disagreement with the ECB’s decision to implement quantitative easing in an interview with German newspaper Welt am Sonntag.

“Bond-buying by the government is not a normal instrument of monetary policy,” Weidmann told the paper on Sunday. Such a policy, when carried out in a monetary union like the Eurozone, “is connected with particular drawbacks and risks,” Weidmann continued, adding that “there should be a high threshold for their use.” Continue reading

The Unraveling in Europe

Geopolitical expert, JR Nyquist, on the situation in Europe:

How bad is the financial situation in Europe? Greece may be about to exit the eurozone, though not according to everyone. The Economic Times of India has published an interview with Jean Lemierre, the chief negotiator for private creditors in the Greece bailout. According to Lemierre, Greece has too much to lose and “a majority of political parties are in favor of the Euro.” Yet the Boston Globe is reporting that Bundesbank President Jens Weidmann has warned Europe’s central banks not to increase their exposure to Greece on account of political uncertainty.

Is there really danger? For those who live in hope, and for those who cling to economic optimism, there is nothing to fear but fear itself. For those who understand the Leftward drift of Europe’s political economy, and the inevitable bankruptcy that implies, there is no uncertainty whatsoever. Bankruptcy is coming for everyone and Greece is merely first in line.

The optimists, of course, are putting a brave face on it. They have Lemierre’s soothing words – and these words are repeated on every side. Bloomberg News is reporting that the “euro has weathered the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression….” Of course, weathering is nothing to worry over. It makes men and currencies stronger. It is no big deal if the euro has lost value of late. It is still above the dollar, and will probably stay above the dollar. Or is there someone with authority who says that Greece will lead the way for a series of euro-defections?

We are approaching a situation in which economic distress engenders political unrest and revolution. If this happens in Europe it will probably happen in the United States as well. Many people will think such a prediction is farfetched, but revolutions have followed on the heels of economic distress in ancient and modern times. It is safe to say that the present economic unraveling isn’t going to stop. The reason for this may be found in the decadence of our civilization. We ourselves have degenerated from our ancestors. All the signs are present, including signs of impending calamity.

Full Article: The Unraveling in Europe (JR Nyquist)