Only One of Six Air Force F-35s Could Actually Take Off During Testing

During a mock deployment at Mountain Home Air Force Base in Idaho, just one of the $100 million Lockheed Martin F-35s was able to boot its software successfully and get itself airborne during an exercise designed to test the readiness of the F-35, FlightGlobal reports. Nonetheless, the Air Force plans to declare its F-35s combat-ready later this year.

Details surrounding the failed exercise were disclosed earlier this week in written testimony presented to Congress by J. Michael Gilmore, the Pentagon’s chief weapons tester. Continue reading

The F-35’s Terrifying Bug List

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AP / RICK BOWMER

 

The Pentagon’s top testing official has weighed and measured the F-35 and found it wanting.

The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program, the most expensive military program in the world, is even more broken than previously thought. The jet can’t tell old parts from new ones, randomly prevents user logins, and trying to eject out of it will likely result in serious neck injury and maybe death. A Pentagon office is warning that the plane is being rushed into service. Continue reading

SCADA hackers reveal endemic ICS vulnerabilities in European rail

Rail networks aren’t the only thing that can be hacked into via SCADA vulnerabilities. Medicine and medication dosages can be altered, contaminate water systems, overflow sewage systems, and the food industry can produce contaminated or poisonous food. These are only but a few of the real risks and dangers America faces — and will likely come under attack from.

For more on SCADAs, please click HERE to view the topic.

Here is one such example post:

UPDATE 3: U.S. probes cyber attack on water system

 

Serious flaws in rail networks are opening trains to stealing and derailment according to a group of Russian industrial control specialist hackers known as Scada Strangelove. Continue reading