The ‘Inevitable War’ Between the U.S. and China

https://i2.wp.com/s.newsweek.com/sites/www.newsweek.com/files/styles/full/public/2016/03/02/philippines-says-china-blocking-access-south-china-sea-atoll..jpg

Chinese soldiers of the People’s Liberation Army Navy stand guard in the Spratly Islands, known in China as the Nansha Islands, on February 10. The Spratlys are the most contested archipelago in the South China Sea. Stringer/Reuters

 

Roughly 15 years ago, a Chinese fighter jet pilot was killed when he collided with an American spy plane over the South China Sea. The episode marked the start of tensions between Beijing and Washington over China’s claim to the strategic waterway. So in May, when two Chinese warplanes nearly crashed into an American spy plane over the same area, many in China felt a familiar sense of nationalist outrage. “Most Chinese people hope China’s fighter jets will shoot down the next spy plane,” wrote the Global Times, China’s official nationalist mouthpiece.

Though little talked about in the West, many Chinese officials have long felt that war between Washington and Beijing is inevitable. A rising power, the thinking goes, will always challenge a dominant one. Of course, some analysts dismiss this idea; the costs of such a conflict would be too high, and the U.S., which is far stronger militarily, would almost certainly win. Yet history is riddled with wars that appeared to make no sense. Continue reading

Beijing to build 10,000ft deep underwater lab in South China Sea

Projects with dual technology use like this should always get a second look. Satellite launches in the name of ‘science’ are often disguising ICBM technology and its capability, as seen by Iran, for example. What China could possibly do with an underwater lab is create an underwater drone launching facility. It could be done from the shore no problem, but this makes it harder to detect.

 

https://cdn.rt.com/files/2016.06/original/575ac5dbc461881c428b45cd.jpg

© Peter D. Blair / Reuters

 

China plans to continue to develop the South China Sea. This time, Beijing has set a goal to build an oceanic ‘space station’, as deep as 3,000 meters underwater, Bloomberg reports, quoting a Science Ministry presentation.

If successful, this will be the first project for long-term human habitation at such depths.  Continue reading

China’s missile swarms vs. America’s lasers, drones and railguns: Who wins?

https://i2.wp.com/atimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Artists-conception-of-a-PLA-anti-ship-ballistic-missile-attack-on-three-USN-CVNs-operating-in-ridiculously-close-proximity.jpg

Artist’s conception of a PLA anti-ship ballistic missile attack on three US Navy carriers

 

This much is true — no country can possibly hope to challenge the United States with military means on a global scale and win. But key to America’s global strength are huge air and naval bases which are vulnerable to being overwhelmed and destroyed by swarms of precision-guided weapons in a limited, regional war.

The Navy also cannot expect its ships to survive if they come under attack by sufficiently large numbers of cruise missiles and ballistic missiles of the kind now fielded by China. While better protected from missiles than bases, the current breadth of U.S. technology and doctrine cannot compensate for this weakness. Continue reading

US Pacific Fleet smaller, even as China’s military grows

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (AP) — The U.S. Pacific Fleet is shrinking even as the U.S. and its allies are facing challenges posed by China’s growing military power.

U.S. Navy officials say the more advanced ships of today make up for the decline in numbers. But the Navy has also had to lengthen deployments and postpone maintenance to maintain its presence with fewer ships.

Peter Jennings, an expert at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute think tank, said the issue in peacetime is whether there are enough American vessels to reassure friends and allies. Continue reading