European Values (I)

BERLIN/WARSAW (Own report) – High-ranking German politicians are calling for punitive measures against Poland. The Polish government’s measures neutralizing the country’s constitutional court as well as its new media laws are “in violation of European values,” according to Volker Kauder, Chair of the CDU/CSU parliamentary group. The EU member states must now “have the courage to impose sanctions.” Earlier, EU Commissioner Günther Oettinger called for Poland to be placed “under supervision.” Even though the new media law, formally placing public service media under direct government control, are in fact more drastic, the forms taken by this official media control are already widespread throughout the EU. Hungary is not the only country to have enacted a media law, a few years ago, showing striking similarities to the new Polish law. Former President Sarkozy had also adopted similar measures in France. The French rulers still exercise considerable influence over public service media. However, particularly in Germany, with its hubris in seeking to discipline Poland, sharp criticism is frequently raised against the state and state parties’ control of the public service media.

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What Europe’s Elections Were Really About

  • Europe’s impoverishment, resulting from its economic underperformance and unrestrained immigration, mostly from Islamic countries, has caused its voters to opt for national identity, nationalism, regionalism, and the chance to express themselves through a referendum on Europe. Austria’s Freedom Party warmed voters of the prospect of becoming “strangers in their own country.”
  • Thanks to this promise — a referendum on Britain’s membership in the European Union — and that Britain never adopted the euro as its currency, Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron was the only sitting European leader not punished by the voters.
  • Everywhere in Europe, electorates have lost confidence in the bureaucrats of the European Union in Brussels and those of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt. They want once again to be empowered to decide their own political and economic fate.

Europe is in political turmoil. In ever larger numbers, European voters are turning their backs on the established parties and are flocking to populist or nationalist parties on both the right and the left. This shift is happening all over Europe. Last month, one could see it in Britain, Spain, Poland, Italy and Austria. What all the parties have in common is their dissatisfaction with the policies of the European Union, whether because of immigration, the EU’s austerity policies, or its social/ethical agenda. Continue reading

Shock result in Polish vote could signal larger power shift

Europe as a whole has for the longest time been one terrorist attack or economic catastrophe away from a sharp right turn. Immigration issues and resentment towards the EU project are also two others which bring the situation to a slower boil.

 

Defeat for President Bronislaw Komorowski communist-era dissident, a sign that parliamentary elections this fall could be unpredictable

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — It’s being called the biggest shock in Polish politics in years: President Bronislaw Komorowski apparently lost the first round of the country’s presidential election to a previously unknown 42-year-old member of the European Parliament.

The defeat for the communist-era dissident, who has long polled as one of the nation’s most trusted leaders, is a sign that parliamentary elections this fall could be unpredictable. It could even signal a possible return to power for Law and Justice, the right-wing group backing Sunday’s winning presidential candidate Andrzej Duda. It favors a more confrontational attitude to the European Union and neighbor Germany than that of the ruling Civic Platform. Continue reading