Germany’s Identity Crisis Leading to the Rise of the Far Right

Caption: (iStock.com/franckreporter )

 

In a world of uncertainty and crisis, Germany needs a lot of things: A strong leader. A stronger military. Stronger borders. A stable eurozone economy. But there is something else German’s are crying out for: an identity.

In “Germany’s Taboos, Once a Bulwark Against the Far Right, May Now Be Enabling It,” the New York Times wrote:

Since World War II, trying to define the German national identity, much less celebrate it, has been taboo. Doing so was seen as a possible step toward the kind of nationalism that once enabled the Nazi regime. Flags were frowned upon, as was standing for the national anthem.

But spurred by a sense of lost control over the country’s borders, economy and politics, many Germans are reaching for a shared identity but finding only an empty space. Continue reading

MERKEL’S WORST NIGHTMARE: Germany calls for Referendum as ‘people want to be free of EU’

https://i2.wp.com/cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/78/590x/Germany-eu-referendum-684282.jpg

Frauke Petry is calling for a German EU referendum

 

BELEAGUERED Angela Merkel is facing calls for a referendum to free German people of “EU slavery” in the wake of Britain’s sensational decision to cut ties with Brussels.

Far right figures in Alternative for Germany have promised to call their own vote if they clutch power in country’s general election in autumn next year.

A party spokesman branded Brussels a “bureaucracy monster”, before adding: “Next year the AfD will enter the German parliament and Dexit will be top on our agenda”. Continue reading

Frauke Petry: meet the smiling new face of Germany’s far-right

https://i0.wp.com/i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/03601/Frauke-Petry4_3601398b.jpg

Frauke Petry, the 40-year-old leader of Alternative for Germany (AfD) Photo: © Polaris/Eyevine

 

Former chemist and entrepreneur seeks to transform Alternative for Germany (AfD) from party of protest to partner in power.

She has been dubbed the “smiling face” of Germany’s newly resurgent Right and sure enough, as Frauke Petry folds herself neatly into a well-upholstered armchair in a luxury Leipzig hotel, she is indeed smiling.

It is a smile that plays permanently across the face of the 40-year-old leader of Alternative for Germany (AfD) and over the last few months has radiated disarmingly out of thousands of election billboards, glossy magazines and newspaper spreads all across Germany.

Continue reading