Greece ‘in a corner’ as Europe blocks payment

As oft stated here, Greece will not leave the union and it’s all leading back to Berlin, the world’s next superpower, who runs the show on the continent. Worst case scenario: There could be a compromise entailing a two tier currency system that allows regional states to retain their economic sovereignty to some degree — or at least they would think.

Such an idea already has backing from Angela Merkel and if the crisis deepens — because it’s not going to magically go away — look for ideas like these to gain even more traction and possibly become reality. ‘Eurobonds‘ were also another scenario.

For further info on a plausible two tier currency system, please see the following posts:

The new Great Game: Europe looks within for roots of renewal

European Commission Plans for Greater Integration

France Is Heading For The Biggest Economic Train Wreck In Europe

Is Germany Already Signaling The Complete (Economic) Collapse Of The European Union?

 

Greece’s last-ditch attempt to get desperately-needed funds from its euro zone neighbors failed on Wednesday, but the country appears eternally optimistic that a list of reforms — as yet to materialize — will unlock vital aid.

Greece appealed for the European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF) to return 1.2 billion euros ($1.32 billion) it said it had overpaid when it transferred bonds intended for bank recapitalization back to the fund this month, Reuters reported Wednesday.

However, euro zone officials ruled that Greece was not legally entitled to the money, the news wire said. Continue reading

How Greece Folded To Germany: The Complete Breakdown

Through all the ups and downs in the EU at the moment, keep in mind the bigger picture: The Euro was designed to fail.

It was known a lot of the countries allowed into the EU didn’t meet the requirements to begin with, but were intentionally let in to fulfill the end goal: Break nations in half and create vassal states in subservience to a resurgent German hegemon through bailouts from it’s Troika proxy that require giving up national sovereignty in exchange.

 

Having, as we previously explained, been given ‘just enough rope’ by the Germans, we thought it worth looking at just what Greece capitulated on (or perhaps a shorter version – what they did not capitulate on) and how Tsipras and Varoufakis will sell this to their fellow politicians… and most of all people.

As OpenEurope explains,

What points has Greece capitulated on? Continue reading

Russia Abandons PetroDollar By Opening Reserve Fund

2015 has not been good to Russia; the spread between Brent and WTI is gone in anticipation of US exports and both benchmarks have flirted with sub $45 prices. A hostage to such prices, the ruble has yet to begin its turnaround and the state’s finances are in extreme disarray. President Vladimir Putin’s approval ratings remain sky-high, but his country has not faced such difficult times since he took office more than 15 years ago.

Since the turn of the new year the ruble has fallen over 13 percent and Russia’s central bank and finance department are running out of options – to date, policy makers have hiked interest rates to their highest level since the 1998 Russian financial crisis and embarked on a 1 trillion-ruble ($15 billion) bank recapitalization plan to little effect. Their latest, and most dramatic, plan is to abandon the dollar – at least somewhat. Continue reading