Sounding The Alarm On The Country’s Vulnerability To An EMP

Whether the source is a natural phenomenon, a terrorist attack or somehow an honest accident, it’s said 90% of the American population would perish from an EMP. When the power goes off nation-wide, food in grocery stores will spoil, hospital generators will only back everything up for so long and critical medicines will not be able to be produced. This doesn’t include those who pass away in the shock of it all or those killed during civil unrest while fighting over necessities. It would also take years to repair the damage as this would continue going on. It’s also said that America’s lights can be completely turned off from 9 critical substations alone (See also HERE).

 

In the past here at Peak Prosperity, we’ve written extensively on the threat posed by a sustained loss of electrical grid power. More specifically, we’ve warned that the most damaging threat to our grid would come from either a manmade or natural electromagnetic pulse (EMP).

A good friend of mine, Jen Bawden, is currently sitting on a committee of notable political, security and defense experts  — which includes past and present members of Congress, ambassadors, CIA directors, and others — who are equally concerned about this same threat and have recently sent a letter to Obama pleading for action to protect the US grid. Continue reading

Securing Command — Strategic commander worried about cyber attacks on nuclear command and control

At times, news like this makes one wonder if it’s a strong case of déjà vu that was probably never fully admitted.

U.S. strategic nuclear weapons and the command systems that control them are vulnerable to cyber attacks although most are hardened against many types of electronic attacks, the commander of the U.S. Strategic Command said on Tuesday.

Air Force Gen. C. Robert Kehler said during a hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee that nuclear weapons and the communications used to control them are older and thus less vulnerable to disruption by computer network attacks.

“However, we are very concerned with the potential of a cyber related attack on our nuclear command and control and on the weapons systems themselves,” Kehler said. “We do evaluate that.” Continue reading