How China’s cyber command is being built to supersede its U.S. military counterpart

Servicemen of the People’s Liberation Army of China during the military parade in commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the Victory in the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945. (Wikicommons)

 

As U.S. leaders contemplate a proper definition for “cyberwar,” their counterparts in China have been building a unit capable of fighting such a large-scale conflict.

China’s rival to U.S. Cyber Command, the ambiguously named Strategic Support Force (SSF), is quietly growing at a time when the country’s sizable military is striving to excel in the digital domain.

Though the American government is widely considered to be one of the premier hacking powers — alongside Israel, Germany, Russia and the United Kingdom — China is rapidly catching up by following a drastically different model. Continue reading

China says it doesn’t fear ‘trouble’ in S. China Sea

An Asian security summit ended in discord Sunday after China denounced US “provocations” in the South China Sea and declared it does not fear trouble in the contested waters.

“The South China Sea issue has become overheated because of the provocations of certain countries for their own selfish interests,” Admiral Sun Jianguo told an annual forum in Singapore.

Sun, who stressed China’s desire for a peaceful solution, spoke one day after US Defense Secretary Ashton Carter said any Chinese construction on an islet near the Philippines would prompt unspecified “actions” by the United States and other nations. Continue reading

US to sail submarine drones in South China Sea

 

As it watches China build up its presence in the South China Sea, one reclaimed island at a time, the US military is betting on a new technology to help retain its edge — submarine drones.

During the past six months, the Pentagon has started to talk publicly about a once-secret programme to develop unmanned undersea vehicles, the term given to the drone subs that are becoming part of its plan to deter China from trying to dominate the region. Continue reading

Analysis: Saudi Arabia Cooking Up Strategic Move Against Russia

One can only assume, since there is no backlash from the United States or NATO in reaction to this buildup, it’s being encouraged behind the scenes by the Obama administration.

 

Saudi-Turkish threat to invade Syria points to the gap between the desire for a cease-fire agreement and reality. Judging by Russia’s conduct so far, Riyadh and Ankara might want to reexamine what could be a dangerous gamble.

The news from Munich on Friday that a cease-fire would be declared in Syria within a week was still fresh when Saudi Arabia announced its own initiative: It would send warplanes to Turkey and special ground forces to fight in Syria against the Islamic State organization. The Saudi-Turkish proposal demonstrated just how great the gap is between hopes for an end to the fighting and the situation on the ground. Continue reading

Update: America Has No Arab Allies

On December 9, 2015, Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee.

His comments state the reality of so-called Arab allies. Continue reading

Why Won’t President Obama Let the Pentagon Stand Up to Russia and China?

Top Pentagon officials are deeply concerned about the increasingly provocative behavior of Russia and China. They say these Asian giants will soon instigate great power battles unless the United States takes bold action in standing up to them. But the Obama administration disagrees with this assessment, and prevents the Pentagon from taking such action.

At the Reagan National Defense Forum on November 7, Pentagon chief Ashton Carter said: “We do not seek to make Russia an enemy. But make no mistake; the United States will defend our interests, our allies, the principled international order, and the positive future it affords us all.” Continue reading

Inside the Ring: Russian military flights over Iraq questioned

For more on Edward Snowden, his likely pre-scandal Russian spy links, American lives he puts in jeapardy and the havoc he’s wreaking on America’s national security, please see HERE. Thanks to him this is why the Russians can counter American moves in Europe and the Middle East before the moves are made.

 

Iraq’s government has told the United States that it will not permit Russian military forces to conduct air and missile strikes inside the country. But Baghdad is allowing Russian military aircraft to overfly its territory to resupply its forces, despite a request from the United States to deny the flights.

Sen. Tom Cotton, Arkansas Republican, disclosed during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing Tuesday that the U.S. government asked the governments of Bulgaria and Iraq to close their airspace to Russian aircraft several weeks before Moscow’s Syria military intervention. Continue reading

Ashton Carter: U.S. to Begin ‘Direct Action on the Ground’ in Iraq, Syria

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter said Tuesday that the U.S. will begin “direct action on the ground” against ISIS forces in Iraq and Syria, aiming to intensify pressure on the militants as progress against them remains elusive.

“We won’t hold back from supporting capable partners in opportunistic attacks against ISIL, or conducting such missions directly whether by strikes from the air or direct action on the ground,” Carter said in testimony before the Senate Armed Services committee, using an alternative name for the militant group. Continue reading

Report: Russian Airstrikes in Syria Were Aimed at CIA-Backed Rebels

https://i0.wp.com/s.newsweek.com/sites/www.newsweek.com/files/styles/headline/public/2015/09/30/russia-confirms-syria-isis-airstrike.jpg

Russian Sukhoi Su-25 fighter planes arrive at Iraq’s al-Muthanna military airbase at Baghdad airport, in Baghdad, July 1, 2014. Stringer/Reuters

 

Updated| A Russian airstrike in Syria on Wednesday was aimed at anti-regime rebels backed by the CIA and other intelligence services, U.S. officials told to The Wall Street Journal. 

Targeting American-backed fighters, who are trying to depose Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, the Journal reports, could increase tensions between Washington and Moscow at time when the two countries share a common enemy: the Islamic State (ISIS). Continue reading

US preparing for potential conflict in South China Sea: report

During the Air & Space Conference and Technology Exposition held by the Air Force Association in National Harbor, Maryland on Sep. 16, the US secretary of defense, Ashton Carter, said Washington was already moving ahead to prepare for a potential conflict with China in the disputed South China Sea region, Russia’s Tass news agency reports. Continue reading

Russia’s nuclear weapons buildup challenges Obama’s reduction goal

https://i0.wp.com/twt-thumbs.washtimes.com/media/image/2015/09/02/9_2_2015_ring-28201_s878x605.jpg

 

President Obama’s decision two years ago to reduce the role of nuclear weapons in U.S. military and defense policies is being challenged by Russia’s large-scale buildup of nuclear forces, along with Moscow’s revised nuclear doctrine and recent threats to use the weapons.

The U.S. guidance was outlined in a 2013 White House order called Presidential Policy Directive-24, which calls for reducing the role of U.S. nuclear weapons in national security strategy and maintaining deterrence with smaller nuclear forces.

One flaw in the White House guidance was outlined in the classified PDD-24. PDD-24 says a “key part” of the new guidance is a more benign global security environment, but that has not come to pass under Mr. Obama’s watch. Continue reading

Plan B For Iran

https://i0.wp.com/images.politico.com/global/2015/06/23/b2-spirit.jpg

 

If the nuclear negotiations go bad, the U.S. has a backup: Obama can drop the MOP, the world’s largest non-nuclear bomb.

President Barack Obama’s nuclear diplomacy with Iran may yet fail. On Tuesday, exactly one week before a June 30 deadline for an agreement, Iran’s Supreme Leader delivered his latest in a series of defiant statements, setting conditions for a deal—including immediate relief from sanctions, before Iran has taken steps to limit its nuclear program—that Obama will never accept. Secretary of State John Kerry warned last week that the U.S. is prepared to walk away from the talks. And even if a deal is reached, the story is not over. The Iranians may break or cheat on an agreement, and try build a nuclear weapon anyway.

That’s why, at least three times in the past year, a B-2 stealth bomber has taken off from an Air Force base in Missouri and headed west to the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. For these missions, the $2 billion plane was outfitted with one of the world’s largest bombs. It is a cylinder of special high-performance steel, 20 feet long and weighing 15 tons. When dropped from an altitude likely above 20,000 feet, the bomb would have approached supersonic speed before striking a mock target in the desert, smashing through rock and burrowing deep into the ground before its 6,000 pounds of high explosives detonated with devastating force. Continue reading

Pentagon Rushing to Open Space-War Center To Counter China, Russia

https://i1.wp.com/cdn.defenseone.com/media/img/upload/2015/06/23/Ops_Center/defense-large.JPG

 

Prepping for war in orbit, the military is honing tactics and building a new center to coordinate defense and development.

The Pentagon and intelligence community are developing war plans and an operations center to fend off Chinese and Russian attacks on U.S. military and government satellites.

The ops center, to be opened within six months, will receive data from satellites belonging to all government agencies, Deputy Defense Secretary Robert Work said Tuesday at the GEOINT symposium, an annual intelligence conference sponsored by the United States Geospatial Intelligence Foundation. Continue reading

Russia May Strengthen Military Force in Kaliningrad

MOSCOW (Sputnik)– Russia may reinforce its military presence in its westernmost Baltic exclave of Kaliningrad in response to the United States deployment of weapons in western Europe, a Russian lawmaker said Tuesday. Continue reading

Cold War Resurgent: US Nukes Could Soon Return to Europe

Germany isn’t blind, but is behaving blind by willingly looking the other way. If it ever had to choose sides, it would likely do so in Russia’s favor. The anti-American sentiment across Europe rising plus NATOs current inability to handle war with Russia, as well as recognizing the need to be able to protect themselves, is why you see the foundations for an EU Army being built. America isn’t even prepared and has no defense whatsoever against a Russian nuclear attack.

 

Washington is once again talking about stationing nuclear warheads in Europe. Russia, too, is turning up the rhetoric. Europeans are concerned about becoming caught in the middle of a new Cold War.

Berlin is concerned that Europe could once again become the setting of a new East-West confrontation — and that Germany might once again become a deployment zone. A source in the Defense Ministry suggested that “more (military) equipment may once again be stockpiled in Germany.” Washington plans to station tanks, weapons and heavy equipment for 5,000 soldiers in Germany and the eastern NATO countries. US President Barack Obama hopes that doing so will soothe the fears of the Baltic States and countries in Eastern Europe, which, since the Ukraine crisis, are once again fearful of Russian aggression. He also hopes to quiet his critics in US Congress.

For German Chancellor Angela Merkel, this prospect is not a pleasant one. She shies away from publicly criticizing her American allies, but Merkel is loathe to do anything that might heat up the conflict with Moscow. Furthermore, a new debate on rearmament would hardly be winnable on a domestic front. The chancellor would potentially look like a puppet of the United States, one who not only allows herself to be spied on, but who also stands by as her carefully established link to Putin is damaged. Continue reading